Print

Print


>
>From:         Dirk Köhler <[log in to unmask]>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>                               CALL FOR PAPERS
>
>                          International Conference
>                                     on
>
>    The Concept of Progression in Teaching and Learning Foreign Languages
>
>
>                                   Dublin
>                            26 - 28 February 2004
>
>
>The  notion  of  progression  in  foreign language learning and teaching is
>based  on  the  concept  of linearity. This applies to the overall learning
>process,  even  though  in  recent  time  the  notion of short-term foreign
>language loss has led to the inclusion of 'platforms' in a number of course
>books.  Linearity  is not only reflected in the design of curricula, but is
>also  a factor of great psychological relevance to the learner. The feeling
>of  'getting somewhere' is certainly one of the key elements with regard to
>motivation, attitude and achievement.
>Such  progression  in  foreign  language learning and teaching is, however,
>increasingly less tangible at intermediary and advanced stages: the lack of
>rewarding  feelings  frequently leads to reduced levels of motivation. This
>manifests  itself  in  higher drop-out rates which in turn affect the wider
>perception  of  the  language  itself. Where students have the choice, they
>tend  to  move  away  from the allegedly 'difficult' languages in favour of
>supposedly  'easier'  subjects.  This  trend  is particularly noticeable in
>anglophone  countries.  Facing  this  trend,  it might be asked whether the
>concept  of  a  predominantly linear progression is counter-productive, and
>whether  a  different  perception  of progress might have a more beneficial
>impact   on  the  classroom  practice  of  teaching  and  learning  foreign
>languages.
>
>
>
>
>The conference will consequently focus on the following issues:
>
>-Is the above notion of progression conducive to language learning?
>-Are quantitative instruments of measuring progression misleading?
>-Do curricular goals reflect the specific properties peculiar to the
>language   learning/teaching process?
>-Are there any alternatives? And if so, what kind of alternatives?
>-Has there been significant progress in research on teaching and learning
>languages?
>-What is the relationship between theory and practice in foreign language
>teaching and learning?
>-What kind of progression is reflected in the structure of teaching
>materials?
>
>
>
>
>    Abstracts (approx. 300 words) should be sent to one of the following
>                                  addresses
>                                     by
>                              15 September 2003
>
>
>
>
>Dr. Theo Harden, Dept. of German, University College Dublin, Belfield,
>Dublin 4, Ireland (e-mail:[log in to unmask])
>Dr. Arnd Witte, Dept. of German, NUI Maynooth, Maynooth, Co. Kildare,
>Ireland (e-mail: [log in to unmask])
>Mr. Dirk Kohler (MA), National College of Ireland, IFSC, Mayor Street,
>Dublin 1, Ireland (e-mail: [log in to unmask])
>
>
>
>
>

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html