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At least one has the comfort of knowing one is not alone.
----- Original Message -----
From: "INGELBIEN RAPHAEL" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, March 10, 2003 2:25 PM
Subject: Re: Eliot and Royalism (was : Vichy/Verdenals )


> > even assuming that the
> > England he inhabited by choice for the last half-century of his life
> > had offered him a royalist movement to join.
>
> It did provide such an opportunity, actually. The abdication crisis of
1936
> split English opinion, and some of Edward VIII's supporters wanted a
> bigger public role for their embattled monarch.
> Eliot wrote an (uncollected) article in New English Weekly (25 Feb 1937)
> where he distanced himself from those who held 'a conception of the
monarchy
> in which the hereditary claimant to our allegiance should double the role
of
> duce or fuerher'.
> In other words, Eliot chose to defend the institution of the monarchy
> against the king.
>
> Eliot's connection with the Action Française aroused many suspicions, of
> course. In the review that was referred to recently, Orwell wrote that the
> emphasis on defeat in 'East Coker' was a sign of 'literary Pétainism'. But
> he did not press the point, and stopped short of accusing Eliot of
sympathy
> for collaborationists.
>
> > Jacek Niecko wrote:
> > >
> > > I suspect that Mr Villepin would have felt very comfortable as foreign
> > > minister of the "government" at Vichy.
>
> Whatever his faults (and I'd say there are quite a few), Chirac was the
> first French president to acknowledge the French responsibility for the
> Vichy regime. The recent flurry of e-mails about French affairs was not
just
> thoroughly unpleasant, it also showed that our trolls and nutcases are as
> abysmally ignorant about France as they are about most topics discussed on
> this list.
>
> Yours,
>
> Raphaël
> [log in to unmask]
>