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>  Has he made
> any significant comment on the novelists?  If so, is
> it as perceptive as his comments on poets and poetry?
> I would appreciate any related reply.
>
>
Eliot's criticism of novels (and plenty bad ones at that) is
perceptive, illuminating, and somewhat for voluminous for someone who
claimed in 1956 (OPP, 'The Frontiers of Criticism' that he was not
qualified to discuss the criticism of prose fiction, which he remarked
'seems to me to require a rather different set of weights and measures'.

The best place to look for Eliot's criticism of novels is in Gallup B
(for his introductions) and C (for reviews); you will also find
Dostoevsky mentioned here and there in Selected Essays (most
importantly perhaps in 'John Marston', 1934), and I believe Flaubert
comes up once, in 'Ben Jonson' (1919); Stendhal too--of whom Eliot was
very fond--crops up here and there (you can check the not very
satisfactory index). Eliot was of course very keen on James, too, and
wrote on him often.

Ronald Schuchard in his book, 'Eliot's Dark Angel: Intersections of
Life and Art' (OUP, 1999), discusses Eliot's criticism of novels
intelligently.

Yours, Jennifer