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Marcia Karp wrote:
>
>      I recommend, too, an essay by Archie Burnett in the same issue (5.1)
> of _Literary Imagination_.  " 'Sense Variously Drawn Out': The Line in
> Paradise Lost" is a very different sort of literary writing than
> Hecht's.  Burnett considers how Milton uses the line break as a
> technique in PL.  **Eliot is quoted two or three times.**  A great
> pleasure and instructive, too.
>

I can't prove the following, it's merely a sense I have. While this
technique does operate powerfully in PL, it is brought to its full
fruition in _Paradise Regained_, the supreme power of which is precisely
how it pulls the reader on from line to line, paragraph to paragraph.
And I think it is the _latter_ poem which has had the most influence on
subsequent writers. (I'm ignoring merely "miltonizing" writers who
merely tried to be "grand" by bad imitations of PL.) Pope, Keats, &
Eliot (in Four Quartets) seem (with different results in each case) to
have incorporated the style Paradise Regained deeply into their way of
feeling the world. Perhaps one could add both Brownings to the list, and
if so, then indirectly Milton (of PR) enters into the style of the
_Cantos_.


> Marcia