Print

Print


I'm curious about Jeronimo, origins, connotations &c.
Why is the name a magical incantation associated with speed?

Cheers,
Peter

Dr. Peter C. Montgomery
Dept. of English
Camosun College
3100 Foul Bay Rd.
Victoria, BC CANADA V8P 5J2
[log in to unmask]
www.camosun.bc.ca/~peterm


-----Original Message-----
From: Rickard A. Parker [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2003 5:48 PM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Hieronymo's Mad Againe: On Translating Nerval by Richard
Sieburth


Some web browsing brought me to this page that I found interesting
enough to point the list to.


http://www.penguin.co.uk/shared/WebDisplay/1,,49012_1_0,00.html?cs=10

    Hieronymo's Mad Againe: On Translating Nerval by Richard Sieburth

    My initial point of entry into Nerval - and in this I think I'm fairly
    representative of most English-speaking readers of modern poetry - was
    the close of Eliot's Waste Land. It was there that I first encountered
    the mysterious line "Le Prince d'Aquitaine  la tour abolie" (from
    Nerval's sonnet "El Desdichado"), lodged amid a multilingual mosaic of
    fragments ...


A description of the book is found at:
http://uk.penguinclassics.com/Book/BookFrame/?cs=10&id=014044601X&sym=SYN

    Nerval: Selected Writings
    Gerard de Nerval - Author
    Richard Sieburth - Translator/introduction/note(s)
    Book: Paperback | 129 x 198mm | 448 pages | ISBN 014044601X |
    Jan 1999 | Penguin Classic

Regards,
    Rick Parker