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Nancy Gish wrote:
>
>   There
> were always women who refused to accept the strictures of their culture,
> and in that sense, they did what feminism would affirm.  That is not the
> same as having a feminist political, philosophical, and cultural view of the
> world.
>

I would not consider even Rosa Luxemberg a feminist -- and focusing on
her would I think bring out some of the real difficulty of drawing a
useful line between general liberatory activity and "feminist" activity
and thought, let alone between feminism and mere assertiveness of an
individual woman. This is not because there are no Marxist feminists.
Clara Zetkin and Eleanor Marx both can be considered feminists (or
conscious forerunners of feminism). Lise Vogel, Martha Gimenez, Renate
Bridenthal are quite clearly both marxist and feminist. But Red Rosa,
despite her eventual split with it, was too embedded in the Second
International, and saw women's liberation as merely an eventual result
of class liberation, not as a condition of such liberation, as do
Martha, Renate, & Lise. Involvement in women's struggles led Lise Vogel
to quit a tenured position at Yale in Art History to pursue a doctoral
degree in sociology, which she now teaches at Rider University -- quite
a contrast either to Thatcher or to the present CEO of Hewlett-Packard.

Carrol