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>Seeing Things: Explorations in Vision, Knowledge and Power
>An international & Multi-disciplinary Conference
>May 2-4, 2003: The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada
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>What are the implications of our investments in "...representational
>systems as apparatuses of power"?  [Craig Owens]
>
>Vision has long been the privilieged mode of observation in the West.
>While other cultures have developed more sensory-integrated ways of
>experiencing and describing the world, western cultures have tneded to
>follow the doctrine  of "seeing is believing". Recent critical
>scholarship ha challenged the infallibility of vision and theorized it
>as active, unstable and inseparable from the identity and location of
>the seer/viewer. Similarly, theories of the gaze have opened p dialogue
>around vision, power and subjectivity. In cultures where seeing is
>equated with knowing or knowledge, how has vision and teh organization
>of vision informed political, social and cultural ideals, beliefs and
>structures? Vision as the basis of scientific observation, social
>surveillance and corporeal regulation has historically been embedded
>within colonial, patriarchal and heterosexist discourses and
>constitutive of normative ideals of subjects and citizens. Meanwhile,
>theories of identity often privilege vision as the primary sense through
>which subjectivity is achieved and bodies differentiated.
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>THE CENTRE FOR WOMEN'S STUDIES AND FEMINIST RESEARCH and the  DEPARTMENT
>OF VISUAL ARTS welcome contirbutions, across disciplines, which explore,
>challenge and re-define these and other aspects of the political,
>social, historical, legal and cultural implications of vision. Topics
>may include, but are not limited to: vision and racial classification;
>vision and sexual desire; the limits of the visual as the erotic or
>pornographic; visual consumption and identity; theories of the visual;
>vision and other senses; vision as a mode of scientific observation;
>writing vision; the role of vision in architectural surveillance; vision
>and the body; visual methods of corporeal regulation; the gendering of
>vision; visual identity and legal discourse, etc.
>
>We welcome the submission of proposals for panel sessions or papers (20
>minutes). We also encourage proposals for performance art or other
>performative aspects of this topic.
>
>PLEASE SEND A 1 PAGE ABSTRACT, PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATION AND CONTACT
>DETAILS TO: Alison Lee, Director, Centre for Women's Studies and
>Feminist Research, The University of Western Ontario, University
>College, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7 or WITHIN THE BODY OF AN E-MAIL
>to [log in to unmask]
>Deadline for Submissions: MONDAY, JANUARY 6, 2003.
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