Print

Print


I notice that the Condor story is almost written in haiku form, viz.

Condors in Baja
They are slow to celebrate
3 balk at freedom.

The  story is not particularly poetic, as yet. Let's hope it turns out this
way.

Condors in Baja
again soar rising thermals
climbing to freedom.

Bob Fisher
Independence, Missouri
[log in to unmask]
----- Original Message -----
From: "Edge Wade" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Thursday, October 10, 2002 9:54 AM
Subject: Fwd: [SDBIRDS] Condors in Baja


> This is long, but has some great information--just about all you might
> want to know about California Condors--and, no, the current "wild"
> population is not "countable".
> Edge Wade
> Columbia, MO
> [log in to unmask]
>
> Begin forwarded message:
>
> > From: Michael Evans <[log in to unmask]>
> > Date: Thu Oct 10, 2002  09:05:58 AM US/Central
> > To: SD Birds <[log in to unmask]>
> > Subject: [SDBIRDS] Condors in Baja
> >
> > Condors are back in Baja, slow to celebrate
> >
> > 3 balk at freedom, huddle in their cage in remote mountains
> >
> >
> > By Bruce Lieberman
> > STAFF WRITER
> >
> > October 10, 2002
> >
> >
> > For the first time in more than six decades, the endangered California
> > condor was invited to return to part of its historic range in Baja
> > California yesterday.
> >
> > But when wildlife biologists opened a door in an aviary to free three
> > birds, they politely declined.
> >
> > "Right now, they're still in the pen," researcher Mike Wallace said
> > about half an hour after biologists tried to set the condors free in
> > Sierra San Pedro Martir National Park. "They're afraid of the door."
> >
> > The condors, hatched and raised at the Los Angeles Zoo, weren't in any
> > rush to leave. By nightfall, the birds were still huddled at the far
> > side of their cage, so biologists lowered the door to keep coyotes and
> > other predators away.
> >
> > The condor release is a historic collaboration between the United
> > States and Mexico, and is designed to re-establish the birds in a
> > remote, pine-covered region where experts hope the condors will be
> > isolated from most signs of civilization.
> >
> > Two more condors are scheduled to be freed within the next few days.
> >
> > The birds' hesitation wasn't a surprise, and biologists expected the
> > youngsters to venture into the open soon, said Wallace, head of the
> > California Condor Recovery Team and a wildlife biologist with the San
> > Diego Zoological Society.
> >
> > The return of the California condor to Baja marks a milestone in a
> > 20-year struggle to save the bird from extinction.
> >
> > In 1982, only 23 California condors remained. Today, there are more
> > than 200, with almost 80 of them in the wild.
> >
> > The San Diego Wild Animal Park is home to 35.
> >
> > The condor's slow but steady recovery is heavily invested in Baja
> > California, where biologists hope to evaluate their techniques for
> > captive breeding and establish a population at the southern point of
> > the bird's historic range.
> >
> > "This bird is the icon, both to me and to much of society, of
> > endangered species conservation, of wilderness," said Bruce Palmer,
> > coordinator of the California condor recovery effort in the United
> > States and a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
> >
> > With its wizened bald head, huge body and massive wings, which span
> > nearly 10 feet, the condor looks like something out of Jurassic Park.
> >
> > Yet, the species is no older than the scrub jays in a back yard, said
> > Wallace.
> >
> > "They just look like dinosaurs," Wallace said of the creatures. "They
> > just look very, very old."
> >
> > The condor, a vulture, is in the same family as turkey and black
> > vultures. They are highly social, intelligent and fastidious creatures
> > that bathe in rock pools after eating, and preen in the sun. The
> > consummate fliers can climb 15,000 feet and soar 150 miles or more in a
> > day.
> >
> > Condors, which typically live to 40 years old in the wild, reproduce
> > slowly. They do not reach sexual maturity until at least 5, and females
> > lay one egg every two years.
> >
> > During the Pleistocene Era, which ended 10,000 years ago, condors lived
> > across much of North America. By the early 19th century, they ranged
> > along the Pacific Coast, from British Columbia to Baja California. In
> > 1900, condors were almost entirely limited to Southern California. In
> > 1967, only about 60 were believed left and the federal government
> > listed the bird as endangered.
> >
> > Since 1992, wildlife biologists have reintroduced condors fitted with
> > radio transmitters to the Los Padres National Forest in Ventura County,
> > the Ventana Wilderness Sanctuary near Big Sur, and near the Grand
> > Canyon in Arizona. Biologists track the birds using radio telemetry.
> >
> > Fifty condors, or about 30 percent of those released since 1992, have
> > died. An adult condor recently died in Ventura County, and last week,
> > biologists discovered that a young condor hatched in the wild had died.
> >
> > Some of the birds died after they hit power lines. Others died from
> > lead poisoning after ingesting bullet fragments or buckshot in dead
> > animals left by hunters. Still others were shot, or were killed by
> > eagles or coyotes. Many of the deaths reflect the condors' loss of
> > pristine habitat over the past 200 years.
> >
> > Wildlife biologists began planning for the bird's reintroduction to
> > Baja California more than a decade ago.
> >
> > Rising 10,000 feet above the Pacific and the Gulf of California, the
> > Sierra San Pedro Martir is quintessential condor country. The
> > mountains, rising sharply from the ocean, offer strong updrafts for
> > flying. Sheer rock faces, huge rock outcroppings, open meadows and
> > forested hillsides offer numerous places to roost and feed.
> >
> > Above all, the region is remote, with few people and virtually no signs
> > of them.
> >
> > Reintroducing condors to Baja is "good for Mexico, because it's showing
> > that we do environmental work," said Horacio de la Cueva, a lead
> > Mexican researcher on the project.
> >
> > The initial release will test the effectiveness of having researchers
> > raise captive chicks by using hand-held puppets made from cloth,
> > leather and plastic as surrogate parents. The Los Angeles Zoo used the
> > technique to raise the five condors  three females and two males
> > ranging from 11/2 to 21/2 years old.
> >
> > Raising birds using puppets began in 1983, after researchers discovered
> > that removing eggs from wild pairs sometimes prompted them to lay
> > replacements. There were soon more chicks than adults, so biologists
> > began using the puppets.
> >
> > Wildlife biologists hope to build two self-sustaining populations of
> > 150 birds each in North America  one extending from Baja California to
> > southern Oregon, and a second in Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. Another
> > 150 birds would remain in captivity.
> >
> > Reaching that point could take 10 to 20 years, and only then would
> > wildlife biologists recommend that the federal government remove the
> > condor from its endangered list and declare it threatened, Palmer said.
> >
> > "We are a ways away ... but we can get there," he said. "I think this
> > is really doable."
> >
> > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> > Bruce Lieberman: (619 )293-2836; [log in to unmask]
> >
> >
> > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
> >
> >
> > ------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
> > Sell a Home with Ease!
> > http://us.click.yahoo.com/SrPZMC/kTmEAA/MVfIAA/70TolB/TM
> > ---------------------------------------------------------------------~->
> >
> > Community email addresses:
> >   Post message: [log in to unmask]
> >   Subscribe:    [log in to unmask]
> >   Unsubscribe:  [log in to unmask]
> >   List owner:   [log in to unmask]
> >
> > Shortcut URL to this page:
> >   http://www.onelist.com/community/SDBIRDS
> >
> > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
> > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
> >
> >
> >
> >>
> >
>
> ________________________________________________
> * Audubon Society of Missouri's     *
> * Wild Bird Discussion Forum        *
> *-----------------------------------------------*
> * To unsubscribe send the message               *
> *    SIGNOFF MOBIRDS-L                          *
> * to [log in to unmask]                   *
> * To subscribe send the message                 *
> * SUBSCRIBE MOBIRDS-L your name                 *
> * to [log in to unmask]                   *
> *-----------------------------------------------*
> * To access the list archives from July 2002:   *
> * http://po.missouri.edu/archives/mobirds-l.html*
> #################################################
>

________________________________________________
* Audubon Society of Missouri's     *
* Wild Bird Discussion Forum        *
*-----------------------------------------------*
* To unsubscribe send the message               *
*    SIGNOFF MOBIRDS-L                          *
* to [log in to unmask]                   *
* To subscribe send the message                 *
* SUBSCRIBE MOBIRDS-L your name                 *
* to [log in to unmask]                   *
*-----------------------------------------------*
* To access the list archives from July 2002:   *
* http://po.missouri.edu/archives/mobirds-l.html*
#################################################