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Discussing Baudelaire's Satanism, Eliot states: "Satanism itself, so far
as not merely an affectation, was an attempt to get into Christianity by
the back door.  Genuine blasphemy, genuine in spirit and not purely
verbal, is the product of partial belief, and is as impossible to the
complete atheist as to the perfect Christian.  It is a way of affirming
belief."  From "Baudelaire," _Selected Essays_ 373.

J. P. Earls, OSB
St. John' University
Collegeville, MN  56321

-----Original Message-----
From: Jennifer Formichelli [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Sunday, October 27, 2002 4:38 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Two points re recent posts, reply to Peter and Carol


Two points.

First, Peter writes: "Eliot's note
> about Baudelaire's sneaking into Christianity by
> the back door."

Where might this note be found? Does Eliot say Baudelaire 'snuck into
Christianity by the back door'?

Second, Carol:
"Kurtz is
dead (in Marlow's narrative)". Kurtz is dead by the time Marlow relates
the
story. In his narrative, however, Kurtz is alive almost until the end.

Yours, Jennifer

----- Original Message -----
From: "Peter Montgomery" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Sunday, October 27, 2002 12:47 AM
Subject: Re: TWL epigraph (the thread about TWL, not capitalism)


> This HORROR business always reminded me of Eliot's note
> about Baudelaire's sneaking into Christianity by
> the back door. Once he discovered that Jumping Jack Flash
> really exists, he realised that the rest of the constellation
> was in placeas well.
>
> I am curious, Carrol about your, to me, dogmatic certainty
> that there is no end to capitalism.
>
> Cheers,
> Peter
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Carrol Cox
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Sent: 10/26/02 5:19 AM
> Subject: Re: TWL epigraph (the thread about TWL, not capitalism)
>
> [log in to unmask] wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> > In other words, TSE initially had decided to use a quite
> inward-looking quote
> > from Conrad ("The Horror! The Horror!"),
>
> "Inward-looking"? Perhaps, but the carnage in the Congo was such that
> "The Horror" is a violent understatement, and not inward looking at
all.
> Classical allusions, however, carry a tone of "it's all happened
before,
> nothing is new."
>
> Carrol