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Ken Armstrong wrote:

> At 03:49 PM 10/9/2002 -0400, you wrote:
> >What suggests it is an argument at all?  It does not set itself up to be
> >logical or not circular.
>
>    You imply that it does set itself up to be  something. What?

Dear Ken and All,

    Here is Ovid on Atalanta:

     talis erat cultu, facies, quam dicere vere
     virgineam in puero, puerilem in virgine possis
     [Metam.,VIII.332-323]

No need to know the language in order to see the chiasmus in the second
line.  Girl boy, boy girl.  [The Latin inflections make it harder to be as
vague or suggestive (or what you will) as Keats is in his line.]
    Here's John Dryden's translation

     Such was her Face, as in a Nymph display’d
     A fair fierce Boy, or in a Boy betray’d
     The blushing Beauties of a modest Maid. [Meleager and Atalanta,
     74-76]

He keeps the rhetorical figure.  Both Ovid and Dryden enact the difficulty of
separating Atalanta’s tightly mingled  parts.  I'd always taken Keats'
pronouncement as a similarly indivisible whole.  Have I been too
simple-minded?

Marcia