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I agree here with Steve. The point that Trimalchio has already made two
howlers is relevant, and the emphatic point in the epigraph is not 'I want
to die', but 'ego ipse' (I saw myself ): the focus is on Trimalchio, not on
the Sibyl.
----- Original Message -----
From: <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, October 26, 2002 3:17 PM
Subject: Re: TWL epigraph (TWL, not capitalism)


> In a message dated 10/26/02 8:17:29 AM EST, [log in to unmask] writes:
>
> > We are told by someone else of the pain each suffers though
> > a short quote of their's--"The horror" and "I want to die."
>
> But Rick, if you look at the context of the "I want to die" quote in the
> Satyricon you'll see that the tone is not serious at all. Trimalchio tells
> the story at a banquet, in the spirit of a drunken "whopper", a wholly
> unbelievable "fish tale". Jennifer has mentioned that the Sibyl was
already
> dead for centuries when Trimalchio claimed to have seen her. In the
> immediately preceding lines, Trimalchio had botched two classical
allusions
> (to Hercules and to the Cyclops). And note that in the line immediately
after
> the story, Encolpius describes Trimalchio's story as "chattering"
> ("Trimalchio was still chattering on like this when our table was covered
by
> a tray with a huge pig on it.").
>
> How do you account for using a passage with this tone if TSE was simply
> trying to convey the pain of a person's suffering?
>
> -- Steve --