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I raise canaries and finches, and have noted that wing fluttering can be
an indication of nervousness, stress, and sometimes of heat.  The most
common and vigorous, though is mating behaviour.  In juveniles, I would
expect it to be begging for food.
Jo Strange.

On Wed, 4 Sep 2002 11:06:50 -0500 Edge Wade <[log in to unmask]> writes:
> Bertrice Bartlett asked if the wing fluttering of juvenile passerines
> is
> also a characteristic of other species.  No one has responded.  Is
> it
> because no one knows?  I don't.  I've watched ostriches, including
> chicks, and other non-passerines--think how many times we've watched
> baby killdeer, for instance--but I cannot recall wing fluttering
> among
> them.
>
> Incidently, wing fluttering is also a part of courtship.  Perhaps
> the
> female is gauging the suitability of a male as a provider by his
> response to her flutters.
>
> Edge Wade
> Columbia, MO
> [log in to unmask]
>
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