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From: INGELBIEN RAPHAEL
From: Peter Montgomery

> BTW rolling trousers came in at about the time Prufrock
> was written. It was a statement of youthful rebellion.

That's an interesting take on the line. When I was first introduced to
the
poem, the lecturer suggested another explanation: as Prufrock imagines
he is
shrinking with age ('I grow old'), he starts adatping the content of his
wardrobe to his diminished stature. In that case, 'rolled' should be
interpreted as 'hemmed in' - not quite convincing, perhaps.
Have you got a reference for rolling trousers as a sign of rebellion?
Would
white flannel have been rebellious as well? Another possibility: rolling
the
bottoms of one's trousers was an obvious thing to do before venturing
onto
the beach.
=======================================================
Learned it from uncle Marshall (McLuhan) in his 3rd year
lit. class. He did a couple of his later degrees at
Cambridge in the '30s, soI guess he'd been there and
done that. He particularly liked to punt, if memory
serves.

Rick has, I have seen, subsequently confirmed the above in his EMILY post.

Cheers,
Peter

Yours,

RaphaŽl Ingelbien
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