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If you're studyng this, you might enjoy "The Great War and Modern Memory" by
Paul Fussell.  I hesitate to suggest a book just because I happen to have
read it, when there are so many great books I haven't read, but this one was
right on regarding your subject, and perhaps the best sociological history
I've ever read, so it can't hurt for me to throw the suggestion out.

Tom K
----- Original Message -----
From: "Nancy Gish" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2002 8:22 PM
Subject: Re: OT Re: Towers and Dust - On Topic: ELiot and WWI


> I am working on a paper on this, and it is not about "influence."  It is
about
> the way his own life was far more directly engaged in it and how it then
> has an impact on the poem.
>
> I will be giving it at MSA in October, so it is in very initial stages.
> Nancy
>
>
>
> Date sent:              Sat, 14 Sep 2002 18:19:22 +0200
> Send reply to:          "T. S. Eliot Discussion forum."
<[log in to unmask]>
> From:                   frank kretschmer <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject:                Re: OT Re: Towers and Dust - On Topic: ELiot and
WWI
> To:                     [log in to unmask]
>
> Nancy:
>
> >I spent much of the
> >summer reading about WWI because I believe Eliot was much more
> >immediately and directly affected by it and his poetry more focused on it
> >than has been usually discussed.
>
> Studying WWI poetry as well as WWI rhetoric provides an impressive
> example
> of how easily people are seduced by what is commonly regarded as
> "poetic
> measures", most notably by means of metaphorical comparison. I spent
> some
> of my summer holidays studying speeches by Lloyd George and other
> political and religious leaders, and found that to a great extend, they
> used poetry and poetic means as an effective feature in their propaganda;
> using basically metaphorical notions to justify their joining the war that
> could otherwise hardly be justified. I would (very roughly put) argue,
> that being thus misused, poetics changed dramatically after WWI, and that
> especially Pound or Cummings sought for a new poetic expression after the
> war _expressive verbis_ due to this misuse. (Pound i.e. in Mauberley). I
> do not see such a clear influence on Eliot though, although there are may
> echoes of the war in TWL. I must admit, however, , that I limited my
> studies on WWI poetry to poems written during and shortly after the war,
> ending with Mauberley, and did not want to undertake the study of Eliot's
> later poems in this respect.
>
> During war time, apart from one or two poems published in the
> "Inventions", and some articles, Eliot staid mostly silent regard to the
> war. To me, his 1943 poem "note on War poetry" is a justification for this
> poetic silence, as well as a reconsideration of what war poetry had
> achieved and what the relationship of war and poetry should be.
>
> But then again, as I have said, I have not looked into the matter very
> deeply, being mainly concerned with British War propaganda at the moment.
>
> Where would you see the influence on Eliot's Poetry?
>
> Yours,
>
> Frank
>
> PS.:
>
> >What horrified me was the way current
> >rhetoric from the White House is the same as the absurdly cheerful belief
> >that the War would be quick (over by Christmas) and easy and glorious.
>
> Would be an interesting study what metaphors Bush uses to justify his war.
> Without looking, I am that sure he uses them. Some things never change.
>
> Oh, and Gunnar:
>
> >save your fury for a better purpose and ignore her stupid diatribe, ok?
>
> I wasen't that furious. But somehow I did not feel like ignoring the mail.