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Hmm.  As an undergraduate, I got something like a "nice thought" comment
from my prof. for proposing that WWI was "the shadow" that fell between the
essence and the descent of the West.  Probably a decent insight, though I
never did anything with it.

No need to chide me for back-patting; I'm just reflecting on a memory.  Like
too many things I wrote it college, I wrote it in substantial part because I
thought it sounded good.  That said, I think the influence of WWI on Eliot's
generation can hardly be overstated, so I think I agree with myself on this
one.

Tom K
----- Original Message -----
From: "Peter Montgomery" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, September 14, 2002 8:22 PM
Subject: Re: Eliot and World War One


> From: INGELBIEN RAPHAEL
>
> In a recent issue of ELH, somebody proposed an interpretation of 'The
> Hollow
> Men' as a Great War poem (the 'we' being soldiers in the trenches).
> There
> were some intriguing parallels between the imagery used in the first
> sections of the poem and motifs used by War poets, but on the whole I
> couldn't help thinking that the reading was a bit far-fetched.
> ==============================================================
> On the other hand WWI was more than a bit far-fetched,
> it was an ultimate absurdity or the worst kind.
> Wyndham Lewis was one of the official Canadian govt
> artists for WWI. He said it was the battlefields
> that taught him how to do abstract compositions.
>
> Cheers,
> Peter