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Eliot's use of allusion, whether literary or not, is really fascinationg.
Sometimes he uses them not just as *thematic material* or *means for
compression*, but as a hint revealing his method.

It might be of some interest, that the famous line from Burbank on "...a
perspective of Canaletto" refers not only to a general idea of space, but
to the actual painting by Antonio Canaletto titled "Perspective". It is
famous for eclectcism of the depicted scenery and the use of *interior*
artistic space, which seems later to turn into the *spatial form* of TSE's
famous poem.

http://www.kfki.hu/~arthp/html/c/canalett/2/perspect.html

Cheers,

TK