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>Call for Papers for Proposed Panel Session
>
>Imagining A Different Future:
>The Politics of Postcolonial Reconciliation
>
>At the present moment in history there is an unprecedented proliferation
>of public scenes and processes of collective reconciliation.  So global
>and widespread is this current phenomenon of reconciliation that it
>seems to have become a common, even guaranteed, feature of national and
>international politics alike.  Witness, for example, the creation and
>operation of truth commissions in South Africa, Chile, and Argentina,
>the emergence of the ìSorryî movement in Australia, and the various
>movements for reconciliation by Palestinians and Israelis.  Yet if
>processes of reconciliation constitute a trend of almost international
>proportions, postcolonial critics have barely begun the immense task of
>assessing its import and implications, as well as problems and
>possibilities.  Especially neglected by critics has been the question of
>the role that literary and other cultural texts perform in contributing
>to discourses of reconciliation.
>
>We solicit proposals on a wide range of issues related to the topic of
>collective reconciliation.  Specific questions that presenters might
>consider could includeóbut are not limited toóthe following:  What is
>the relationship between postcolonial reconciliation and resistance?
>How do discourses of reconciliation operate in a gendered manner?  What
>is the relationship between reconciliation and related concepts such as
>guilt, repentance, remembrance, apology, forgiveness, restitution, and
>redress?  How do specific cultural, linguistic, religious and other
>differences inform and affect demands and desires for reconciliation?
>Do practices of collective reconciliation efficaciously undermine or
>transform positions of dominance and subordination or only reinforce
>them?  How does the proliferation of projects of collective
>reconciliation relate to processes of globalization?  If postcolonial
>reconciliation is indeed possible, what are its conditions of
>possibility?  Given that it is often corporations and nation-states that
>facilitate processes of reconciliation, what does it mean for
>institutions to express affect (e.g. regret, shame, contrition)?  How is
>it possible to apportion responsibility for (post)colonial crimes and
>racial wrongdoing without resorting to such reified categories as
>colonizer and colonized?
>
>Papers will be presented at the annual conference of the Canadian
>Association of Commonwealth Language and Literature Studies (CACLALS) at
>the Congress of Social Sciences and Humanities, 29-31 May 2003,
>Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.  Presenters must be
>members of CACLALS at the time of the conference.
>
>Send 250-500 word abstracts on any aspect of collective reconciliation,
>as well as a bio of approximately 100 words to:
>Julie McGonegal, Department of English, McMaster University, Hamilton,
>ON, L9H 2YG ([log in to unmask]),
>or,  David Jefferess, Department of English, McMaster University,
>Hamilton, ON, L9H 2YG ([log in to unmask])
>
>Deadline for submissions: November 1, 2002.
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