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>(Post)-Coloniality and Under-Examined Empires: The Literatures and Cultures
>of and about the Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and Ottoman Empires
>
>An examination of early orientalist texts quickly reveals that various
>peoples under the Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and Ottoman Empires are
>depicted similarly to their overseas counterparts as both feared and exotic
>Easterners that need to be civilized by the West.  However, most work in
>contemporary (post)-colonial studies concentrates on the British and French
>(and perhaps Spanish) Empires and their aftermath.  In order to address
>this critical oversight, this panel invites proposals on any aspect of
>literature and culture pertaining to the Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and
>Ottoman Empires and their continuing relevance in the present. In other
>words, the panel wishes to explore especially the literatures and cultural
>discourses of and about geographical spaces where the three empires
>intersected, such as the present day Balkans, Mitteleuropa, and Eurasia in
>reference to their histories as parts of the afore-mentioned  empires.
>
>Possible issues to examine in the proposals include (but are not limited
>to) the following:
>
>1.     How do narratives about conquest in the three empires compare to
>the narratives of  conquest in the British, French, and/or Spanish Empires?
>  Are there texts of the conquest that have not yet been examined in the
>global arena?  Can canonical texts (such as Kafka, Pushkin, Lermontov,
>etc.) be read as texts that justify and/or resist imperial conquest?
>
>2.     What kind of hybrid texts and equivalent cultural phenomena
>appear in the Balkans, Mitteleuropa, and Eurasia as a result of imperial
>conquests?  How is this hybridity negotiated through history?  What forces
>threatened hybridity during the empires existence?  Are there any forms of
>hybridity preserved in the empires aftermath?
>
>3.     To what degree can we use the discourse developed by contemporary
>post-colonial studies to discuss texts and contexts from and about the
>geographical spaces that the Austro-Hungarian, Russian, and Ottoman Empires
>occupied?
>
>4.     How are discourses of the three empires relevant for the peoples
>inhabiting their geographical space in the empires violent dissolution at
>the beginning of the twentieth century?  How does the imperial past
>resonate in the complex and volatile cultural spaces of the Balkans,
>Mitteleuropa, and Eurasia at the end of the twentieth and the beginning of
>the twenty-first centuries?  How do texts inscribe the relationship
>between the imperial past and the new imperial pretensions of the
>European Union and the United States?
>
>The American Comparative Literature Association 2003 Conference
><http://www.csusm.edu/acla2003> will be held at Cal State San Marcos
><http://www.csusm.edu> in North San Diego County, April 4-6, 2003.
>
>Email 250-300 word proposals with basic contact information by
>October 12 to Vlatka Velcic at [log in to unmask]
>
>
>