Print

Print


>
>
>  > > CFP: Cartographies of Corporeality
>>  > ACLA Conference April 4-6, 2003
>>  > San Marcos California
>>  >
>>  > The Deadline for Submissions for the following panel has been extended
>to September 25, 2002
>>  >
>>  > This panel seeks proposals for 20-30 minute papers which interrogate
>the overlap and 'crossing' between mapping the world and mapping the body.
>A persistent theme in post-colonial writing as well as in feminist fiction,
>these 'somatic mappings' often explore how the body crosses over into
>places/cultures/geographies and how places/culture/geographies map
>themselves onto bodies. In contemporary fiction, writers such as Jeanette
>Winterson, Jamaica Kinkcaid, Peter Carey, Bharati Mukherjee, Margaret
>Atwood, Michael Ondaatje and Junot Diaz have 'mapped' the relationship
>between bodies and geographies in diverse ways. In addition, recent
>theoretical accounts such as Places Through the Body, Thinking Through the
>Skin, Bodies Out of Bounds, Nomadic Subjects, Bodies that Matter, and
>Bodies of Thought have charted various inroads examining the complex
>dialectic between bodies and places.
>>  >
>>  > This panel seeks to discuss these various 'cartographies of
>corporeality' in relation to the general conference theme of 'crossing
>over'.  Papers reading these somatic mappings through the guise of
>contemporary theory are particularly welcome.
>>  >
>>  > More generally, this panel seeks to address some of the following
>questions:
>>  >
>>  > How do different types/genres/styles of fiction map the body? (i.e.
>post-colonial, feminist, Victorian, science fiction, the grotesque,etc.)
>>  > What are the effects of conceiving of the body as a zone to be mapped?
>How do such configurations ally with cybernetic/virtual conceptions of the
>body?
>>  > How is gender/race/class/sexuality mapped onto the body?  How can these
>mappings be reconfigured?
>>  > What are the delimiting/enabling factors of conceiving of the body as a
>'land mass' that can be traversed, codified, and charted?
>>  > Does identity politics, as theorist Wendy Brown claims, 'map' the body
>as abject?
>>  > How can Judith Butler's conception of "Bodies that Matter" be allied to
>a reconfigured mapping of various types of bodies?
>>  > How do particular historical epochs, cultural trends, geographical
>locations map the body?
>>  > What corporeal cartographies have emerged/are emerging in the 21st
>century?
>>  > How are political/presidenital bodies mapped?
>>  > How does nationalism inform somatic mapping?
>>  >
>>  > Please send 400 word abstracts to Natalie Wilson at
>[log in to unmask]  Please ensure abstracts are sent in the body of the
>e-mail, not as attachments.
>  >
>  >
>  > --- Natalie
>  > --- [log in to unmask]
>
>