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>CFP: Environment and Class (12/1/02; ASLE 6/3-6/7/3)
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>We invite proposals for a panel on "Environment and Class" at the 2003
>Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE)
>conference at Boston University, Boston, MA, June 3-7, 2003.
>
>Understandings of environment have often been constructed in class terms,
>frequently without awareness of the social roots or implications of such
>constructions.  Although the environmental justice movement has recently
>brought attention to these issues of class in social policy decisions, in
>relation to the allocation of resources and distribution of environmental
>costs and pollution, the role of class in historical and literary
>constructions of environment still remains largely overlooked in relation to
>other significant social categories such as race and gender.
>
>This panel hopes to deepen awareness of class issues in constructions of
>environment, building on the work of critics like Raymond Williams and John
>Barrell by asking questions such as: How have idea of "nature" or
>environment included voiced or unvoiced constructions of class?  How and why
>do literary texts represent different classes in different ways when writing
>about the environment?  How do the values espoused by environmentally
>focused texts and ecological ways of thinking relate to the values and
>assumptions of various classes?   Do different classes construct their
>identities differently in relation to the environment or appeal to the
>environment in different ways as a source of value and validation for their
>social positions?  How do different classes have different access to or
>relationship with wilderness and other features of the environment?  How
>have the politics of writing intersected with the politics of class in
>literary texts?
>
>We hope to organize multiple panels, depending on the number of responses.
>We invite proposals from all literatures and periods, but especially in
>relation to eighteenth and nineteenth century Britain and America, including
>proposals that take a transatlantic perspective.
>
>Mail or email brief proposals by December 1, 2002 to:
>
>Scott Hess <[log in to unmask]>
>English Department
>Earlham College
>Richmond, IN 47374
>
>or
>
>Lance Newman <[log in to unmask]>
>Literature and Writing Studies
>California State University, San Marcos
>333 South Twin Oaks Valley Road
>San Marcos, CA 92096-0001
>
>----------
>
>>From the conference website:
>
>Confirmed speakers at ASLE 2003 include E. O. Wilson and Laura Walls (for a
>dialogue on interdisciplinary work between the sciences and humanities);
>Lawrence Buell and Leo Marx (for a debate on ecocriticism); Barbara Neely
>(author of Blanche Cleans Up, a novel touching on environmental justice
>issues, set in Boston); urban environmental historian Sam Bass Warner
>(author of Streetcar Suburbs and The Urban Wilderness); Cynthia Huntington
>(author of The Salt House, about Cape Cod); John Hanson Mitchell (author of
>Living at the End of Time and Ceremonial Time, among other works); native
>American storyteller, essayist, and poet Joseph Bruchac; ecologist Sandra
>Steingraber (author of Living Downstream and Having Faith); and fiction
>writer and environmental activist Grace Paley.
>The conference slogan is taken from Henry David Thoreau's "Ktaadn": "the
>solid earth! the actual world!" The conference themes
>("Sea--City--Pond--Garden") seek to emphasize the attractions of the
>conference location, so presentations are especially encouraged on coastal
>literature, urban and suburban nature, environmental justice, the
>Thoreauvian and Emersonian influences on nature writing, and landscapes with
>human figures. The conference will begin on Tuesday 3 June with small
>workshops in the afternoon and an opening plenary session in the evening.
>Concurrent sessions will run 4-7 June. The afternoon of Thursday 5 June will
>feature field sessions at such places as the Arnold Arboretum, the Olmsted
>National Historic Site, the Emerald Necklace of urban parks, and Boston
>Harbor. Field trips on Saturday 7 June will take participants to Plum Island
>Nature Reserve, Provincetown (on the Cape, via ferry), and Concord (and
>Walden Pond and the Thoreau Institute).
>For more info:  www.asle.umn.edu <www.asle.umn.edu>
>
>