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>
>Northeast Modern Language Association
>2003 Convention
>
>March 6-9, 2003
>Boston, Massachusetts
>
>Call for Papers
>
>The 2003 NEMLA convention will be held in Boston, MA at the Hyatt
>Regency Hotel, March 6-9.  All participants in a session must be NEMLA
>members and registered for the convention by December 1, 2002;
>membership forms (http://www.nemla.org/membership.html) and conference
>registration forms (http://www.nemla.org/registration.html) are available.
>Chairs are responsible for responding to all inquiries.  Members may present
>only ONE paper and they may participate in another session in another
>capacity (i. e. organize and chair, serve as a respondent on a panel).  Chairs
>may present a paper on any panel that they chair.
>
>The deadline for submissions to Panel Chairs is September 15, 2002.
>Completed Panel Forms (also found at the Web-site) must be submitted to
>the Executive Director by October 1, 2002 via email or regular post.  Chairs
>are responsible for making AV requests with the hotel, as NEMLA will no
>longer cover AV costs (see page 1).  All panel participants must be NEMLA
>members and must be registered for the convention by December 1, 2002 or
>they will be removed from the final program.
>
>[...]
>
>Germanic Studies
>
>Orientation Processes in German Literature(s) after Unification
>Barbara Mabee; Oakland University; 418 Wilson Hall; Rochester, Michigan
>48309
>Phone: 248-370-2099; Email:  [log in to unmask]
>This session invites papers that discuss literary representations or
>depictions
>of  orientation processes in post-unification German literature in any genre.
>
>Narratives of the Self: German Travel Literature
>Karen M. Eng; Department of German; Hoya Station; Box 571048;
>Washington, D.C. 20057
>Phone: 703-243-7762; E-mail: [log in to unmask]
>Travel literature seems to be most obviously discussing the place or the
>people visited, but in defining those “sites of Otherness,” the
>observer is most
>often closely describing the self.
>
>Rereading Eighteenth-Century Germany
>Stuart Barnett; 20 Quorn Hunt Rd; West Simsbury, CT 06092
>Phone: 860-651-3927; Email: [log in to unmask]
>This intentionally non-prescriptive panel seeks to invite papers indicative of
>the influx of new perspectives and methodologies (such as Feminism, New
>Historicism, Queer Theory, Cultural Studies, and Post- Colonial Studies) in
>this field.
>
>Thomas Bernhard’s Fiction and Drama
>Steve Dowden; Germanic and Slavic Languages; Brandeis University; MS
>024; Waltham, MA 02454
>Phone: (781) 736-3218; Email: [log in to unmask]
>Thomas Bernhard’s fiction and drama are now identifiable as a turning point
>in the history of Austria’s postwar literature. Exactly what is
>Berhard’s legacy
>in Austria, Germany and elsewhere?
>
>The Middle East in German Literature
>Roland Dollinger; Sarah Lawrence College; 1 Mead Way; Bronxville, NY
>10708
>Phone: (914) 395-2248; Email: [log in to unmask]
>Abstracts should explore the representation of Israelis, Palestinians (and
>other Arabs), the Middle-East conflict, Zionism, Anti-Zionism and/or Anti-
>Semitism in German literature and culture.
>
>Lost Landscapes: The Historical Coordinates of German-Speaking Countries
>in Contemporary Literature and Culture
>Jill Twark; 1024 Drake Street, # 2; Madison, WI 53715
>Email: [log in to unmask]
>I invite papers that explore the imbrications of space and time/landscape and
>history in contemporary German (-speaking) literature and culture, e. g.,
>spatial metaphors,  the locus of memory,  the meaning of place(s).
>
>Bodmer/Breitinger, Keller/Meyer and Dürrenmatt/Frisch: Dialogue or
>Dichotomy, Cross Influences and Re-Interpretations of Swiss "Paired"
>Literary Twins and/or Opposites
>Richard R. Ruppel; Department of Foreign Languages; 490 Collins Classroom
>Center; University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point; Stevens Point, WI  54481
>Phone:  (715) 346-4410 (office); Fax: (715) 346-4215; E-mail:
>[log in to unmask]
>Abstracts proposing a re-interpretation of the works of these six authors
>including their individual or collective influence upon one another,
>upon other
>artists and their work and upon the literary traditions of their own time or
>other authors and literary periods would be most welcome.
>
>Detecting Ethnicity in Modern German Detective Novels
>Claude P. Desmarais ; P.O. Box 178, Station “P”; 74 Spadina Avenue;
>Toronto, ON M5S 2S7
>Phone: 416-324-8492; Email: [log in to unmask];
>[log in to unmask]
>Papers dealing with modern German-language detective novels which depict
>the interactions between ethnic-Germans and “minorities” (ethnic non-
>Germans) and the possible effects of such texts on ethnic relations in
>Germany.
>
>’Bürgerliche Kultur:’  The Nineteenth Century’s Predominant Paradigm Re-
>Visited
>Thomas L. Buckley; 516 E. Durham St.; Philadelphia, PA  19119
>Phone: 215-247-7819; Email: [log in to unmask]
>Papers are sought, which illuminate new perspectives on bourgeois culture,
>in particular those which shed light on emerging middle-class attitudes
>toward science, politics and shifting cultural values.
>
>Migrancy, Immigration and National Identity in Germany
>Helga Druxes; Professor of German and Comparative Literature; Williams
>College 14 Fairview St; Bennington, VT 05201
>Phone 802 -447-7002; Email: [log in to unmask]
>Twentieth-century literary, filmic and journalistic responses to immigration
>and migrancy in Germany from a historical perspective, in connection or
>opposition to notions of Germanness and citizenship.
>
>Conceptions of Nature in Contemporary German Culture
>Colin Riordan; 19 Eastcliffe Avenue; Kenton Park; Newcastle upon Tyne;
>NE3 4SN; United Kingdom
>Phone: 0044 191 242 3766; Email: [log in to unmask]
>How is nature represented in German culture today? As a resource, an idyll,
>a victim of patriarchal domination? Ecocritical approaches to
>literature, film,
>music etc are encouraged but not required.
>
>Germany and New England, 1770 – Present
>Arnd Bohm; Carleton University; English Department; 1125 Colonel By Drive;
>Ottawa, ONT K1S 5B6
>Phone: (163) 526-3440; Email: [log in to unmask]
>All aspects, genres and channels of interaction, including individual American
>reception (e.g. Emerson, Longfellow, Santayana, Kerouac), German images
>(travel writing, exile literature), translations (Celan’s Dickinson,
>Thoreau and
>the Greens), institutions (universities, academies).
>
>Tourism in German Literature, Culture and Film: Expression of (Post-)
>Modernity
>Birgit Tautz; Bowdoin College; 7700 College Station; Brunswick, ME 04011-
>8477
>Phone: (920) 832-6647 or (920) 832-6648 or (207) 725-3357
>Email: [log in to unmask] (between June 17 and August 30)
>This panel addresses textual and cinematic representations of tourism and
>the tourist in modern German culture (1800 – present), with a special
>emphasis on the role tourism and the tourist played in the emergence of
>cultural/historical modernity and post-modernity.
>
>Comparative German Studies
>Neil H. Donahue; Department of Comparative Literature; 322 Calkins Hall;
>107 Hofstra University; Hempstead, NY 11549
>Email: [log in to unmask]
>This panel examines the intertextual relations (or influence or affiliations)
>between a German language text and/or author and a non-Western culture,
>or vice versa, between a non-Western text and/or author and a Germanic
>culture.
>
>Guenter Grass: Assessing a Multitalented Artist and Political Gadfly
>Herbert A. Arnold; Department of German Studies; Fisk Hall; 262 High
>Street; Middletown, CT 06459-0040
>Phone: (860) 685-2308; E-mail: [log in to unmask]
>Grass is arguably the most important and prolific German writer of the
>second half of the twentieth century, creating major works of poetry, drama,
>and prose and providing them with his own illustrations.  How do his
>productions relate to each other and to the politics of post-war Germany?