Print

Print


Ron Houssaye wrote:

> To understand the poem, I look at the givens first.  When is a dry
> month, who is an old man being read to by a boy, where is a windy,
> draughty place.  On the literal level, an old man waits to die living
> along, but attended to by a woman and a boy.  He is Prufrockian in his
> anxious, despairing existence, and in his tone:  "These with a
> thousand small deliberations/Protract the profit of their chilled
> delirium/Excite the membrane when the sense has cooled"  But is he
> really an allegorical figure, and if so, who or what does he
> represent?

Dear Ron,
    Can you say something about your thinking moving from "the givens"
to the question of allegory?  Why that particular move?  Is it in
service of finding what is universal in the particulars (or maybe what
is particular lurking behind or within what is in someway unplaced)?

Marcia