Print

Print


This message is in MIME format. Since your mail reader does not understand
this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.

------_=_NextPart_001_01C19399.B5273710
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset="iso-8859-1"

 Try Western Civilization...?

-----Original Message-----
From: Ron Houssaye [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Wednesday, January 02, 2002 2:15 AM
To: tse
Subject: Gerontion


Reading over the poem again, I tended to feel sympathy for the narrator, the
dull, old man in the "decayed house."  I do not find "gerontion" in the
dictionary, but the greek *geras* = old age is noted.   To understand the
poem, I look at the givens first.  When is a dry month, who is an old man
being read to by a boy, where is a windy, draughty place.  On the literal
level, an old man waits to die living along, but attended to by a woman and
a boy.  He is Prufrockian in his anxious, despairing existence, and in his
tone:  "These with a thousand small deliberations/Protract the profit of
their chilled delirium/Excite the membrane when the sense has cooled"  But
is he really an allegorical figure, and if so, who or what does he
represent?
 


------_=_NextPart_001_01C19399.B5273710
Content-Type: text/html;
	charset="iso-8859-1"

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">


<META content="MSHTML 5.00.2314.1000" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT color=#0000ff face=Arial size=2><SPAN 
class=990442514-02012002>&nbsp;Try Western Civilization...?</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV align=left class=OutlookMessageHeader dir=ltr><FONT face=Tahoma 
  size=2>-----Original Message-----<BR><B>From:</B> Ron Houssaye 
  [mailto:[log in to unmask]]<BR><B>Sent:</B> Wednesday, January 02, 2002 2:15 
  AM<BR><B>To:</B> tse<BR><B>Subject:</B> Gerontion<BR><BR></DIV></FONT>
  <DIV><FONT color=#008080 face="Book Antiqua" size=5><STRONG>Reading over the 
  poem again, I tended to feel sympathy for the narrator, the dull, old man in 
  the "decayed house."&nbsp; I do not find "gerontion" in the dictionary, but 
  the greek *geras* = old age is noted.&nbsp;&nbsp; To understand the poem, I 
  look at the givens first.&nbsp; When is a dry month, who is an old man being 
  read to by a boy, where is a windy, draughty place.&nbsp; On the literal 
  level, an old man waits to die living along, but attended to by a woman and a 
  boy.&nbsp; He is Prufrockian in his anxious, despairing existence, and in his 
  tone:&nbsp; "These with a thousand small deliberations/Protract the profit of 
  their chilled delirium/Excite the membrane when the sense has cooled"&nbsp; 
  But is he really an allegorical figure, and if so, who or what does he 
  represent?</STRONG></FONT></DIV>
  <DIV><FONT color=#008080 face="Book Antiqua" 
  size=5><STRONG>&nbsp;</STRONG></FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>

------_=_NextPart_001_01C19399.B5273710--