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This is just my opinion. But when I first looked at Rosenberg's work, I could 
see right away why Eliot liked it. They're very similar in some ways, as in, 
for example, the taste for grotesquerie, which I think of as very modernist. 

Rosenberg might be more intense--I think his poem about God goes further 
than, say, Eliot's "The Hippopotamus." But he doesn't have Eliot's range, or 
didn't live long enough to develop it.  I've never seen anything of his that 
was comparable to, say, "La Figlia che Piange." But, again, this is just my 
opinion.

pat

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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>This is just my opinion. But when I first looked at Rosenberg's work, I could 
<BR>see right away why Eliot liked it. They're very similar in some ways, as in, 
<BR>for example, the taste for grotesquerie, which I think of as very modernist. 
<BR>
<BR>Rosenberg might be more intense--I think his poem about God goes further 
<BR>than, say, Eliot's "The Hippopotamus." But he doesn't have Eliot's range, or 
<BR>didn't live long enough to develop it. &nbsp;I've never seen anything of his that 
<BR>was comparable to, say, "La Figlia che Piange." But, again, this is just my 
<BR>opinion.
<BR>
<BR>pat</B></FONT></HTML>

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