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In a message dated 9/2/01 3:55:29 PM !!!First Boot!!!, [log in to unmask] 
writes:


> It is an interesting theory that only thoughtful people may be really 
> prejudiced and that the slips we make without thought are not part of our 
> "real" attitudes.  Unfortunate that it feels so "real" to those on the 
> receiving 
> end. 
> 

That was not what I meant; rather, thoughtful people sometimes make 
thoughtless remarks, usually in an attempt to be amusing.

As to the another list person's point that at the time Eliot lived, Jews were 
not as integrated into the European and American societies as they are now, I 
can only speculate on the truth of this theory since I didn't live then; I 
mean England had a Jewish Prime Minister under Queen Victoria and according 
to historical accounts, Jews and other ethnic groups from Eastern Europe 
traveled in waves into Western Europe and the US beginning before that time, 
so I believe that many of them were probably well integrated into the various 
societies at Eliot's time.  Take Leonard Woolfe.  No doubt some of these 
people when first arriving did keep to themselves at first, but with the 
exception of extreme groups (Chassidic Jews for instance), this situation did 
not last long.  In fact, I read an article in the NY Times sometime ago, 
where a prominent NY Rabbi was expressing his fears that in another 
generation or two, there will be no Jewish community to speak of in the 
United States due to the high rate of intermarriage and assimilation; in fact 
then, the opposite theory of the original comments in this thread is probably 
true; and is this a good thing for literature? As to Eliot himself, I tend to 
think he was not really anti-Semitic, in spite of a couple of comments and a 
couple of lines in a poem.  Certainly, American Presidents and Senators are 
not Anti-Semitic; they all seem to have affairs with young Jewish women, but 
in defense of Bill, at least Monica is not among the missing (my attempt to 
be amusing).

Kate

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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2>In a message dated 9/2/01 3:55:29 PM !!!First Boot!!!, [log in to unmask] 
<BR>writes:
<BR>
<BR>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">It is an interesting theory that only thoughtful people may be really 
<BR>prejudiced and that the slips we make without thought are not part of our 
<BR>"real" attitudes. &nbsp;Unfortunate that it feels so "real" to those on the 
<BR>receiving 
<BR>end. 
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">
<BR>That was not what I meant; rather, thoughtful people sometimes make 
<BR>thoughtless remarks, usually in an attempt to be amusing.
<BR>
<BR>As to the another list person's point that at the time Eliot lived, Jews were 
<BR>not as integrated into the European and American societies as they are now, I 
<BR>can only speculate on the truth of this theory since I didn't live then; I 
<BR>mean England had a Jewish Prime Minister under Queen Victoria and according 
<BR>to historical accounts, Jews and other ethnic groups from Eastern Europe 
<BR>traveled in waves into Western Europe and the US beginning before that time, 
<BR>so I believe that many of them were probably well integrated into the various 
<BR>societies at Eliot's time. &nbsp;Take Leonard Woolfe. &nbsp;No doubt some of these 
<BR>people when first arriving did keep to themselves at first, but with the 
<BR>exception of extreme groups (Chassidic Jews for instance), this situation did 
<BR>not last long. &nbsp;In fact, I read an article in the NY Times sometime ago, 
<BR>where a prominent NY Rabbi was expressing his fears that in another 
<BR>generation or two, there will be no Jewish community to speak of in the 
<BR>United States due to the high rate of intermarriage and assimilation; in fact 
<BR>then, the opposite theory of the original comments in this thread is probably 
<BR>true; and is this a good thing for literature? As to Eliot himself, I tend to 
<BR>think he was not really anti-Semitic, in spite of a couple of comments and a 
<BR>couple of lines in a poem. &nbsp;Certainly, American Presidents and Senators are 
<BR>not Anti-Semitic; they all seem to have affairs with young Jewish women, but 
<BR>in defense of Bill, at least Monica is not among the missing (my attempt to 
<BR>be amusing).
<BR>
<BR>Kate</FONT></HTML>

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