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In a message dated 9/25/01 4:45:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
[log in to unmask] writes:


> Check this out:
> 
>     "Alec Guinness Discusses His Role in Play By T. S. Eliot"
>     By Maurice Zolotow 
>     February 26, 1950
>         http://www.nytimes.com/books/97/08/24/reviews/guinness-party.html
> 
> Regards,
>    Rick Parker
> 

Interesting article. But Zolotow doesn't distinguish between a psychoanalyst 
and a psychiatrist, and uses the words interchangeably. I'd forgotten, 
though, about the couch, which I think nobody used except Freudian 
psychoanalysts. But I think Nancy's right too about his having religious 
components. One comment that's been made for a long time about Freudian 
psychoanalysis is that it sounds more like a religion than a science. 

Sir Henry seems to me like a very sympathetic figure in the play, which is 
surprising because Eliot didn't care much for Freud. 

pat 

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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>In a message dated 9/25/01 4:45:30 PM Eastern Daylight Time, [log in to unmask] writes:
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></B>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Check this out:
<BR>
<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;"Alec Guinness Discusses His Role in Play By T. S. Eliot"
<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;By Maurice Zolotow 
<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;February 26, 1950
<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;http://www.nytimes.com/books/97/08/24/reviews/guinness-party.html
<BR>
<BR>Regards,
<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;Rick Parker
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR>
<BR>Interesting article. But Zolotow doesn't distinguish between a psychoanalyst and a psychiatrist, and uses the words interchangeably. I'd forgotten, though, about the couch, which I think nobody used except Freudian psychoanalysts. But I think Nancy's right too about his having religious components. One comment that's been made for a long time about Freudian psychoanalysis is that it sounds more like a religion than a science. 
<BR>
<BR>Sir Henry seems to me like a very sympathetic figure in the play, which is surprising because Eliot didn't care much for Freud. 
<BR>
<BR>pat </FONT></HTML>

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