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The following is an article by one of my teachers Mr. Samantak Das which =
appeared in an Indian News paper the other day.
You may find some food for thought in it.
Sobdo=20

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 =20
My brother-in-law (my wife's only sibling) lives in New Jersey and goes =
to work in New York City; on most days he changes trains at the World =
Trade Centre, a major hub of the transportation system of the city. News =
of the WTC bombing reached us from Kolkata (not possessing a television, =
we were blissfully unaware of the dramatic events
unfolding in living rooms around the globe) and our first reaction was =
to find out
if and when my brother-in-law had taken his usual route to work that =
day.

This was easier said than done. It was impossible to call the US of A =
from the abode, where telecommunication services are not quite of the =
first rank. However, relatives in Kolkata managed to place calls to my =
brother-in-law, as did my brother in the US (whom I was able to contact =
via the Internet). All got through to an answering machine. It
was not until the early hours of the next day that we heard that my =
brother-in-law was safe, having passed through the WTC some ten to =
fifteen minutes before the first 'plane hit it.

Since the 11th, I have spent hours poring over newspapers, in =
conversation with family and friends, and on the 'net - trying to make =
sense of this unprecedented tragedy. Even in the first short hours =
following the disaster it became apparent that this event could well
turn out to be the harbinger of much greater and altogether bloodier =
conflicts at an international level.

To put it plainly, it comes down to this. What will the army of the =
world's mightiest nation do to avenge this heinous act? Perhaps by the =
time you read this we will know the answer, but President Bush's =
statement that these attacks were "more than acts of terror. They were =
acts of war." left me with a sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach. =
As did the comparisons with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour. We =
should remind ourselves that that particular act of terror culminated in =
the dropping of atom bombs on the innocent citizens of Hiroshima and =
Nagasaki.

But unlike WW2, this is not a war between sovereign nations with =
well-defined boundaries. And unlike in that war, no amount of bombing, =
nuclear or otherwise, is likely to put a full stop to this particular =
conflict. As a friend put it, "Wonder what the aftermath and the =
after-aftermaths will be? Mr. Bin Laden is the prime suspect - if I were =
him I would already have the response to the response in place."

Another question. Given the levels of (perfectly justified) outrage, =
does President Bush have any option about sending in the troops? If he =
does not, he will lose domestic support - something no politician can =
afford. If he does, he takes on the risk of starting a worldwide =
conflict that may never end.

A participant in the BBC's "Talking Point" on the WTC bombings made the =
point that "eradicating one Bin Laden will only spawn a hundred more". =
Have the British been able to stop the IRA bombings? Have we managed to =
resolve Kashmir? Will the Sri Lankans ever solve the LTTE problem? The =
thought that such conflicts, so far mercifully
contained in relatively small pockets, might take on a global character =
is truly rightening.

It is easy to mouth pious platitudes about the need to exercise =
restraint, much harder to translate such sentiments into realpolitik. I =
fear what we are witnessing is the beginning of a period of social, =
political, and economic instability the likes of which we have never =
experienced before. I hope I am wrong.

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<HTML><HEAD>
<META content=3D"text/html; charset=3Diso-8859-1" =
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<META content=3D"MSHTML 5.00.2614.3500" name=3DGENERATOR>
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<BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D3><SPAN lang=3DEN-GB=20
style=3D"FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; =
mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; =
mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">The=20
following is an article by one of my teachers Mr. Samantak Das which =
appeared in=20
an Indian News paper the other day.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D3><SPAN lang=3DEN-GB=20
style=3D"FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; =
mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; =
mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">You=20
may find some food for thought in it.</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D3><SPAN lang=3DEN-GB=20
style=3D"FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; =
mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; =
mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: =
AR-SA">Sobdo&nbsp;</SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN lang=3DEN-GB=20
style=3D"FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; =
mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; =
mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">
<HR>
&nbsp; </SPAN></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2><SPAN lang=3DEN-GB=20
style=3D"FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman'; FONT-SIZE: 10pt; =
mso-fareast-font-family: 'Times New Roman'; mso-ansi-language: EN-GB; =
mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">My=20
brother-in-law (my wife's only sibling) lives in New Jersey and goes to =
work in=20
New York City; on most days he changes trains at the World Trade Centre, =
a major=20
hub of the transportation system of the city. News of the WTC bombing =
reached us=20
from Kolkata (not possessing a television, we were blissfully unaware of =
the=20
dramatic events<BR>unfolding in living rooms around the globe) and our =
first=20
reaction was to find out<BR>if and when my brother-in-law had taken his =
usual=20
route to work that day.<BR><BR>This was easier said than done. It was =
impossible=20
to call the US of A from the abode, where telecommunication services are =
not=20
quite of the first rank. However, relatives in Kolkata managed to place =
calls to=20
my brother-in-law, as did my brother in the US (whom I was able to =
contact via=20
the Internet). All got through to an answering machine. It<BR>was not =
until the=20
early hours of the next day that we heard that my brother-in-law was =
safe,=20
having passed through the WTC some ten to fifteen minutes before the =
first=20
'plane hit it.<BR><BR>Since the 11th, I have spent hours poring over =
newspapers,=20
in conversation with family and friends, and on the 'net - trying to =
make sense=20
of this unprecedented tragedy. Even in the first short hours following =
the=20
disaster it became apparent that this event could well<BR>turn out to be =
the=20
harbinger of much greater and altogether bloodier conflicts at an =
international=20
level.<BR><BR>To put it plainly, it comes down to this. What will the =
army of=20
the world's mightiest nation do to avenge this heinous act? Perhaps by =
the time=20
you read this we will know the answer, but President Bush's statement =
that these=20
attacks were "more than acts of terror. They were acts of war." left me =
with a=20
sinking feeling in the pit of my stomach. As did the comparisons with =
the=20
Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour. We should remind ourselves that that=20
particular act of terror culminated in the dropping of atom bombs on the =

innocent citizens of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.<BR><BR>But unlike WW2, this =
is not=20
a war between sovereign nations with well-defined boundaries. And unlike =
in that=20
war, no amount of bombing, nuclear or otherwise, is likely to put a full =
stop to=20
this particular conflict. As a friend put it, "Wonder what the aftermath =
and the=20
after-aftermaths will be? Mr. Bin Laden is the prime suspect - if I were =
him I=20
would already have the response to the response in =
place."<BR><BR>Another=20
question. Given the levels of (perfectly justified) outrage, does =
President Bush=20
have any option about sending in the troops? If he does not, he will =
lose=20
domestic support - something no politician can afford. If he does, he =
takes on=20
the risk of starting a worldwide conflict that may never end.<BR><BR>A=20
participant in the BBC's "Talking Point" on the WTC bombings made the =
point that=20
"eradicating one Bin Laden will only spawn a hundred more". Have the =
British=20
been able to stop the IRA bombings? Have we managed to resolve Kashmir? =
Will the=20
Sri Lankans ever solve the LTTE problem? The thought that such =
conflicts, so far=20
mercifully<BR>contained in relatively small pockets, might take on a =
global=20
character is truly rightening.<BR><BR>It is easy to mouth pious =
platitudes about=20
the need to exercise restraint, much harder to translate such sentiments =
into=20
realpolitik. I fear what we are witnessing is the beginning of a period =
of=20
social, political, and economic instability the likes of which we have =
never=20
experienced before. I hope I am wrong.</SPAN></FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>

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