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To those of you interested in the war poets and the Georgians--I'm reading a 
biography of Isaac Rosenberg, by Joseph Cohen, professor emeritus at Tulane. 
Turns out he's a specialist on the war poets, and seems to have done books on 
most of them.

Maybe because Rosenberg died young, I assumed he was some youth tse 
discovered. Actually, they were the same age; Rosenberg's dates are 
1890-1918.  Pound discovered both of them at the same time and sent both of 
their poems to Harriet Monroe at the same time...but then discovered, I 
guess, that he preferred Eliot. 

Here's another quotation:

In one of Harold Monro's chapbooks (Cohen doesn't say which one, but I think 
he means about 1920), Eliot was complaining about the sad state of criticism, 
and wrote, "Let the public, however, ask itself why it has never heard of the 
poems of T. E. Hulme or of Isaac Rosenberg, and why it has heard of the poems 
of Lady Precocia Pondocuf and has seen a photograph of the nursery in which 
she wrote them" (p. 176).

pat

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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>To those of you interested in the war poets and the Georgians--I'm reading a 
<BR>biography of Isaac Rosenberg, by Joseph Cohen, professor emeritus at Tulane. 
<BR>Turns out he's a specialist on the war poets, and seems to have done books on 
<BR>most of them.
<BR>
<BR>Maybe because Rosenberg died young, I assumed he was some youth tse 
<BR>discovered. Actually, they were the same age; Rosenberg's dates are 
<BR>1890-1918. &nbsp;Pound discovered both of them at the same time and sent both of 
<BR>their poems to Harriet Monroe at the same time...but then discovered, I 
<BR>guess, that he preferred Eliot. 
<BR>
<BR>Here's another quotation:
<BR>
<BR>In one of Harold Monro's chapbooks (Cohen doesn't say which one, but I think 
<BR>he means about 1920), Eliot was complaining about the sad state of criticism, 
<BR>and wrote, "Let the public, however, ask itself why it has never heard of the 
<BR>poems of T. E. Hulme or of Isaac Rosenberg, and why it has heard of the poems 
<BR>of Lady Precocia Pondocuf and has seen a photograph of the nursery in which 
<BR>she wrote them" (p. 176).
<BR>
<BR>pat</B></FONT></HTML>

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