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> First, I do NOT speak French, but could line 202 in The Waste Land be translation pun?
> 
> "Et O ces voix d'enfants, chantant dans la coupole" "And, O those children's voices singing in the dome!"
> 
> Could it also be translated "And, O these childlike parsons, lilting in the cupola (or dome)"? or " . . . childlike voices . . ."? Might this be a slap at the religious, or a reference not to children but the quality of the voices?
> 
> Just wondering, and this list may have covered this already, so my apologies if I am plowing an old field, or if this question is too tangential.
> 

> The reason I asked if "Et, O ces voix . . ." might be a pun was because, in looking up the words in translation, I found that "voix" is French for "voice(s)" and "parson(s)". And a parson, according the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language is "An Anglican cleric with full legal control of a parish under ecclesiastical law" and the title of this section of the poem is "The Fire Sermon." Also the business of "washing their feet in soda water" seemed an allusion to a ritual that takes place in some religious denominations where the priest/minister will wash the feet of parishioners at Eastertide (April?)
Also, parson and Parsifal could be punned, if that is not too much of a stretch. And "d'enfants" with a meaning of "childlike" might also mean "innocent" or "naive.">>

No opinon on the punning controvery, but thought I'd note that Parsifal: (i) has his feet washed by Kundry (by her hair, specifically), in the Wagner opera, at least, and (ii) means "the fool made wise by pity", eg, he begins the work as an "innocent youth."

Tom K