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The reason I asked if "Et, O ces voix . . ." might be a pun was because, in 
looking up the words in translation, I found that "voix" is French for 
"voice(s)" and "parson(s)". And a parson, according the American Heritage 
Dictionary of the English Language is "An Anglican cleric with full legal 
control of a parish under ecclesiastical law" and the title of this section 
of the poem is "The Fire Sermon." Also the business of "washing their feet 
in soda water" seemed an allusion to a ritual that takes place in some 
religious denominations where the priest/minister will wash the feet of 
parishioners at Eastertide (April?)
Also, parson and Parsifal could be punned, if that is not too much of a 
stretch. And "d'enfants" with a meaning of "childlike" might also mean 
"innocent" or "naive." So just who is giving this Fire Sermon? naive 
clerics?

I also think most punning is allusional, though allusions are not mostly 
puns.

What do you think?
Steve



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