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Rick,

Something just struck me about Jill's comment about the young man's war
service (thanks, Jill, you had a lot in a really short post) and then
Nancy's reminding us that Eliot was thinking of a man of 21.  I just
started putting dates and ages together and concluded that this guy
didn't serve in the war.  I thought it would make a good topic of
discussion where I wouldn't actually have to type too much.  I sorta
wanted to take the summer off from writing posts but I haven't been able
to handle the quiet. 

When you think about the Tiresias section it really doesn't make a
difference about whether the man was a veteran or not.  His behavior is
like that of many men through time of many circumstances.  Eliot may
have even been thinking about his Harvard classmates. 

One more thought on the topic though - the man was compared to Bradford
millionaires, they didn't see any service either.  So, was that a hidden
TSE comment?  It is often so hard to tell. 


Rick Parker wrote:

> I raised my idea up the flagpole to see if anyone would salute.  You cut
> the lines instead. 

Rick Seddon wrote:

> Well in light of Steve's message and my checking of the facsmile and my
> careless reading of Nancy's original post one of us had better shinny up
> the pole and tie our best knot.  I'm not sure I want to swim up stream
> pushing Jill's idea ahead all by myself with the rest of the list
> heaving rocks.  I wasn't ever a very good swimmer.  You think we can
> talk one of the skivvy wavers into doing it for us? 

For Rick - No, I don't think we can.  And doesn't it seem like we take
turns swimming and rock throwing?  Come to think of it though, your
place is in rock country and I've got the stream at home.  Maybe its a
natural turn of affairs. 

For the group - Rick isn't talking about the time I raised a buddy's
underpants up the flagpole at scout camp here (I doubt he knew.) Its
nautical talk.  Mail list groups usually use a different term. A very
elucidative definition of "skivvy wavers" can be found here:
    http://www.plateau.net/usndd/glossary/s.html

Regards,
   Rick Parker