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Rick Seddon wrote:
> 
> This is interesting.  Pound evidently handled his advisory and editorial
> chores much differently from his translations.  In his translations he very
> definitely tried to adopt a persona of the original author and write a poem
> as if the original author had known English.  The result is something very
> different from what one thinks of as "translation"
> 
> Pound's translations are so much a break with the original that they are
> often considered new creations.--"Homage to Sextus Propertius" set the
> classics world on its ear with virtually all Latin scholars standing in line
> to point out "errors".   In his major guide to Pound's poems (performing the
> same service as Southam), Ruthven refers to the author of "Homage to Sextus
> Propertius" as Propoundius.
> 
Dear Rick,
   Dryden discusses three types of translations.  The third, imitation, is
   just what you describe.  The essay is the preface to a new (to Dryden)
   translation of Ovid's Epistles.

Marcia