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In a message dated 06/12/2001 6:31:20 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
[log in to unmask] writes:


> PS:
> Kate, I share your opinion on capital punishment. Like me, feel free to
> write a little rubbish now and then!
> 
> 
> 
> 

I was listening to a journalist last night whose point I agreed with 
completely.  The issue of capital punishment now comes down to the basics.  
Gunnar, you and other Non-American persons on the list may not be aware of 
some of the reasons some people in this country (who are in the minority, by 
the way) give for coming out against capital punishment.  They are as follows:

The Person may be innocent, a victim of circumstances or another's 
manipulations.
Percentage wise, more blacks are put to death than whites.
Most of the people put to death are poor and do not have adequate defense 
counsel.

Well, in this case, the person was not innocent.  He freely admitted his 
guilt and the evidence was overwhelming.  He was white, not black.  He had 
good attorneys.  Millions of dollars were spent on his defense.

So, the above arguments are just superficial, in fact.  We come to the core 
point.  Does a government have the right to take a human life no matter what 
that person has done?
I say no.  Government has no such right, not the federal government nor the 
states.  Yet, if this country had no capital punishment and a special 
exception was made just for this man, I might say alright.  I might say 
alright for exceptions, for mass murderers.  I don't know.  I might say 
alright because he said that the 19 children were just collateral damage. 
I understand now why Mr. Parker didn't want to respond, for here I am, 
talking, rambling, aloud.  Is the country now purged?  Well, I guess it's 
over, in a way.  I mean, he's dead now.  I don't think we're purged.  I don't 
think most of those people, the survivors and the families and friends of the 
victims, feel much better.  But, it's over, isn't it?

It wasn't like one of our old western movies, Gunnar, where people are seen 
cheering at a lynching.  I could see the shock in everyone's faces yesterday 
morning, people I knew and strangers.  There was a lot of  . . .  silence.


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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=2>In a message dated 06/12/2001 6:31:20 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
<BR>[log in to unmask] writes:
<BR>
<BR>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">PS:
<BR>Kate, I share your opinion on capital punishment. Like me, feel free to
<BR>write a little rubbish now and then!
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR>
<BR>I was listening to a journalist last night whose point I agreed with 
<BR>completely. &nbsp;The issue of capital punishment now comes down to the basics. &nbsp;
<BR>Gunnar, you and other Non-American persons on the list may not be aware of 
<BR>some of the reasons some people in this country (who are in the minority, by 
<BR>the way) give for coming out against capital punishment. &nbsp;They are as follows:
<BR>
<BR>The Person may be innocent, a victim of circumstances or another's 
<BR>manipulations.
<BR>Percentage wise, more blacks are put to death than whites.
<BR>Most of the people put to death are poor and do not have adequate defense 
<BR>counsel.
<BR>
<BR>Well, in this case, the person was not innocent. &nbsp;He freely admitted his 
<BR>guilt and the evidence was overwhelming. &nbsp;He was white, not black. &nbsp;He had 
<BR>good attorneys. &nbsp;Millions of dollars were spent on his defense.
<BR>
<BR>So, the above arguments are just superficial, in fact. &nbsp;We come to the core 
<BR>point. &nbsp;Does a government have the right to take a human life no matter what 
<BR>that person has done?
<BR>I say no. &nbsp;Government has no such right, not the federal government nor the 
<BR>states. &nbsp;Yet, if this country had no capital punishment and a special 
<BR>exception was made just for this man, I might say alright. &nbsp;I might say 
<BR>alright for exceptions, for mass murderers. &nbsp;I don't know. &nbsp;I might say 
<BR>alright because he said that the 19 children were just collateral damage. 
<BR>I understand now why Mr. Parker didn't want to respond, for here I am, 
<BR>talking, rambling, aloud. &nbsp;Is the country now purged? &nbsp;Well, I guess it's 
<BR>over, in a way. &nbsp;I mean, he's dead now. &nbsp;I don't think we're purged. &nbsp;I don't 
<BR>think most of those people, the survivors and the families and friends of the 
<BR>victims, feel much better. &nbsp;But, it's over, isn't it?
<BR>
<BR>It wasn't like one of our old western movies, Gunnar, where people are seen 
<BR>cheering at a lynching. &nbsp;I could see the shock in everyone's faces yesterday 
<BR>morning, people I knew and strangers. &nbsp;There was a lot of &nbsp;. . . &nbsp;silence.
<BR></FONT></HTML>

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