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In a message dated 6/3/01 1:35:09 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
[log in to unmask] writes:

> pat,
> you were right on both points-
> i'm an undergraduate and a hindu.
> and i am a little distanced from my tradition.
> but i like to find out more about it.
> as far back as i remember i've always had what i call
> 'existential questions' - who i am, what i'm , what is
> reality and more in the same vein.
> 

But you're so fortunate. Eliot had to go to Harvard and pay tuition to study 
Eastern philosophy. In the end, he said he still couldn't relate to it, that 
Buddhism left him "mystified." You could learn to understand in a much more 
real or profound way, I think, if you begin by immersing yourself in your own 
tradition as your family understands it. I'm not saying to avoid reading 
Western philosophers.  But at least balance them by reading people like 
Krishnamurti, Coomeraswamy, and others who actually come out of the Eastern 
tradition.

> 
> But bid life sieze the present?
> it lives less in the present
> than in the future always,
> and less in both together
> than in the past.the present
> is too much for the senses,
> too crowding, too confusing-
> too present to imagine.
> 
> 

That's a beautiful poem.

best,

pat


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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>In a message dated 6/3/01 1:35:09 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
<BR>[log in to unmask] writes:
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px"></B>pat,
<BR>you were right on both points-
<BR>i'm an undergraduate and a hindu.
<BR>and i am a little distanced from my tradition.
<BR>but i like to find out more about it.
<BR>as far back as i remember i've always had what i call
<BR>'existential questions' - who i am, what i'm , what is
<BR>reality and more in the same vein.
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR>
<BR>But you're so fortunate. Eliot had to go to Harvard and pay tuition to study 
<BR>Eastern philosophy. In the end, he said he still couldn't relate to it, that 
<BR>Buddhism left him "mystified." You could learn to understand in a much more 
<BR>real or profound way, I think, if you begin by immersing yourself in your own 
<BR>tradition as your family understands it. I'm not saying to avoid reading 
<BR>Western philosophers. &nbsp;But at least balance them by reading people like 
<BR>Krishnamurti, Coomeraswamy, and others who actually come out of the Eastern 
<BR>tradition.
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">
<BR>But bid life sieze the present?
<BR>it lives less in the present
<BR>than in the future always,
<BR>and less in both together
<BR>than in the past.the present
<BR>is too much for the senses,
<BR>too crowding, too confusing-
<BR>too present to imagine.
<BR>
<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">
<BR>
<BR>That's a beautiful poem.
<BR>
<BR>best,
<BR>
<BR>pat
<BR></FONT></HTML>

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