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Rickard Parker wrote:

> I see the Fisher King and the questor both as the poem's poetic self.
> Since I see TWL as a personal poem that means Eliot.  But I don't see
> much of the questor actually in the poem.  He faced some personal
> problems that could be considered a wounding and he had to cope with
> them.  The writing of TWL itself was one way of doing that.  It
> certainly was a deluge of writing after what he must have considered a
>
> drought.  And in the writing he had to face himself, a kind of asking
> a
> question.
>

If what you say is true -- that the writing of the poem was a coping
strategy for the wounded poet -- in what ways does your insight matter
to the reading of the poem?  I don't mean in what ways was Eliot
affected by his own life, but in what ways do readers benefit from
knowing the facts of his life?

M.