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Pat:

Chapter 8 of your book does indeed discuss Dante's animals and I should =
have acknowledged it.  I like your ascription of the three moral faults =
to the three men individually.  It gives an entirely new way of reading =
the poem.  The three men/lusts  could  be used to montage into a single =
Poundian Image.

BTW on a subject the list has abandoned.  I came across the anecdote =
about the Conrad Aiken review of TWL; "An Anatomy of Melancholy" =
yesterday.  It is part of a prefatory note that Aiken wrote for the =
inclusion of the review in Allen Tate's 1966 book "T.S. Eliot, The Man =
and His Work".  The anecdote is on pages 195 and 196.  At the end of the =
anecdote Aiken makes an interesting and tantalizingly vague statement: =
"such passages as 'A woman drew her long black hair out tight' , which I =
had seen as poems, or part-poems, in themselves!".  Several questions =
come immediately to mind.   What other passages?  What poems and =
part-poems?  Where are these forerunners to TWL?  Who else saw and heard =
these poems and part-poems?  The famous notebook that has become the =
facsimile was evidently not all that TSE toted in his famously large =
suitcase to Lake Leman.  Does anyone know if Aiken has ever enlarged =
upon this statement?

Rick Seddon
McIntosh, NM, USA=20

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<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Pat:</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Chapter 8 of your book does indeed =
discuss=20
Dante's animals and I should have acknowledged it.&nbsp; I like your =
ascription=20
of the three moral faults to the three men individually.&nbsp; It gives =
an=20
entirely new way of reading the poem.&nbsp; The three men/lusts&nbsp;=20
could&nbsp; be used to montage into a single Poundian =
Image.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>BTW on a subject the list has =
abandoned.&nbsp; I=20
came across the anecdote about the Conrad Aiken review of TWL; &quot;An =
Anatomy=20
of Melancholy&quot; yesterday.&nbsp; It is part of a prefatory note that =
Aiken=20
wrote for the inclusion of the review in Allen Tate's 1966 book =
&quot;T.S.=20
Eliot, The Man and His Work&quot;.&nbsp; The anecdote is on pages 195 =
and=20
196.&nbsp; At the end of the anecdote Aiken makes an interesting and=20
tantalizingly vague statement: &quot;such passages as 'A woman drew her =
long=20
black hair out tight' , which I had seen as poems, or part-poems, in=20
themselves!&quot;.&nbsp; Several questions come immediately to =
mind.&nbsp;&nbsp;=20
What other passages?&nbsp; What poems and part-poems?&nbsp; Where are =
these=20
forerunners to TWL?&nbsp; Who else saw and heard these poems and=20
part-poems?&nbsp; The famous notebook that has become the facsimile was=20
evidently not all that TSE toted in his famously large suitcase to Lake=20
Leman.&nbsp; Does anyone know if Aiken has ever enlarged upon this=20
statement?</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Rick Seddon</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT color=3D#000000 size=3D2>McIntosh, NM,=20
USA&nbsp;</FONT></DIV></BODY></HTML>

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