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I didn't understand why Dante was asking Helicon to "stream" if it was a 
mountain. Thought it might be also a river, and found this.

"Pegasus is the winged horse from Greek mythology who sprang from Medusa's 
neck when she was killed by Perseus. Pegasus then flew to mount Helicon, 
where, striking the ground with his hoof, a stream began to flow which became 
sacred to the Muses."

So Dante might be actually asking all the muses to help him, but especially 
Urania, the muse of "heavenly things."   The stream is called Hippocrene 
(horse-spring). 

Dante has many references to the muses scattered thorugh the Commedia, and 
for him it's a traditional thing for a poet to invoke the muses or ask them 
to help him. It's still being done by, say, Robert Burns. But for Eliot, it 
would have been anachronistic, and we don't in fact find tse loading his 
poems with prayers to the muses. So there's that other banter element we 
haven't touched on. Pound, horsing around, is saying, everyone knows poems 
are supposed to be inspired by the muses. So which muse could have inspired 
TWL?

pat


In a message dated 3/1/01 7:26:31 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
[log in to unmask] writes:


> > Now 'tis meet that Helicon for me stream forth 
> >      and Urania aid me with her choir to set in verse 
> >      things hard to conceive. 
> >   
> > Note the last word "conceive" fits nicely into the context of your
> > reading. 
> 
>   Setting in verse things hard to conceive is about as Eliotic as it gets.
> And things astronomical play key roles in much of TSE's verse. Nice quote.
> 
> Ken Armstrong
> 



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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>I didn't understand why Dante was asking Helicon to "stream" if it was a 
<BR>mountain. Thought it might be also a river, and found this.
<BR>
<BR>"Pegasus is the winged horse from Greek mythology who sprang from Medusa's 
<BR>neck when she was killed by Perseus. Pegasus then flew to mount Helicon, 
<BR>where, striking the ground with his hoof, a stream began to flow which became 
<BR>sacred to the Muses."
<BR>
<BR>So Dante might be actually asking all the muses to help him, but especially 
<BR>Urania, the muse of "heavenly things." &nbsp;&nbsp;The stream is called Hippocrene 
<BR>(horse-spring). 
<BR>
<BR>Dante has many references to the muses scattered thorugh the Commedia, and 
<BR>for him it's a traditional thing for a poet to invoke the muses or ask them 
<BR>to help him. It's still being done by, say, Robert Burns. But for Eliot, it 
<BR>would have been anachronistic, and we don't in fact find tse loading his 
<BR>poems with prayers to the muses. So there's that other banter element we 
<BR>haven't touched on. Pound, horsing around, is saying, everyone knows poems 
<BR>are supposed to be inspired by the muses. So which muse could have inspired 
<BR>TWL?
<BR>
<BR>pat
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>In a message dated 3/1/01 7:26:31 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
<BR>[log in to unmask] writes:
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></B>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">&gt; Now 'tis meet that Helicon for me stream forth 
<BR>&gt; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;and Urania aid me with her choir to set in verse 
<BR>&gt; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;things hard to conceive. 
<BR>&gt; &nbsp;&nbsp;
<BR>&gt; Note the last word "conceive" fits nicely into the context of your
<BR>&gt; reading. 
<BR>
<BR> &nbsp;Setting in verse things hard to conceive is about as Eliotic as it gets.
<BR>And things astronomical play key roles in much of TSE's verse. Nice quote.
<BR>
<BR>Ken Armstrong
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#0f0f0f" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR></FONT></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>
<BR></B></FONT></HTML>

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