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Nanct,

Thank you!

pat
==============================
In a message dated 3/18/01 1:19:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
[log in to unmask] writes:


> The reason English changed so much is that in 1066 the Normans 
> conquered the Saxons, and French became the language of the court while 
> the common people continued to speak Anglo Saxon.  The two languages 
> fused to become modern English.  Even the English of Medieval Court 
> poets is easier to read than other versions of English.  That is why 
> Chaucer 
> is more or less readable with study, but the Pearl Poet is much much 
> harder.
> 
> Also, there were four dialects of Old English.  Mercian, which was the 
> language of the Midlands, developed into Middle English of the midlands, 
> while West Saxon and Kentish died out, and Northumbrian developed into 
> Modern Scots.  The vowel changes took place much more slowly and less 
> completely in the North, so Scots, for example, is closer to German than is 
> English today.  So a set of different "languages" in a divided set of 
> countries in which the court was--from 1603 on--in the English Midlands 
> developed in diverse ways and in ways that kept masses of French terms.  
> The result is that modern English is incredibly rich in synonyms, poor in 
> rhymes, and very difficult to learn because it is full of exceptions.  
> Moreover, the remnants of Germanic verb and noun forms are uneven and 
> erratic, so we have to learn irregular and regular verbs and differentiate 
> pronoun cases but not noun cases.  And lots of other oddities. Nancy  
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 



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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>Nanct,
<BR>
<BR>Thank you!
<BR>
<BR>pat
<BR>==============================
<BR>In a message dated 3/18/01 1:19:14 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
<BR>[log in to unmask] writes:
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></B>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The reason English changed so much is that in 1066 the Normans 
<BR>conquered the Saxons, and French became the language of the court while 
<BR>the common people continued to speak Anglo Saxon. &nbsp;The two languages 
<BR>fused to become modern English. &nbsp;Even the English of Medieval Court 
<BR>poets is easier to read than other versions of English. &nbsp;That is why 
<BR>Chaucer 
<BR>is more or less readable with study, but the Pearl Poet is much much 
<BR>harder.
<BR>
<BR>Also, there were four dialects of Old English. &nbsp;Mercian, which was the 
<BR>language of the Midlands, developed into Middle English of the midlands, 
<BR>while West Saxon and Kentish died out, and Northumbrian developed into 
<BR>Modern Scots. &nbsp;The vowel changes took place much more slowly and less 
<BR>completely in the North, so Scots, for example, is closer to German than is 
<BR>English today. &nbsp;So a set of different "languages" in a divided set of 
<BR>countries in which the court was--from 1603 on--in the English Midlands 
<BR>developed in diverse ways and in ways that kept masses of French terms. &nbsp;
<BR>The result is that modern English is incredibly rich in synonyms, poor in 
<BR>rhymes, and very difficult to learn because it is full of exceptions. &nbsp;
<BR>Moreover, the remnants of Germanic verb and noun forms are uneven and 
<BR>erratic, so we have to learn irregular and regular verbs and differentiate 
<BR>pronoun cases but not noun cases. &nbsp;And lots of other oddities. Nancy &nbsp;
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>
<BR></B></FONT></HTML>

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