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[log in to unmask] wrote:

> ...
>
>    In the article, the evidence of the allusion is given as this:
>
> Dans:     Monsieur, le fait est dur.
>   [it's a hard fact]
> Commedia: Ahi, quanto a dir qual era e cosa dura
>   [Ah, how hard it is to tell what that wood was]
>
> Dans: Moi j'avais peur
>  [I was afraid]
> Commedia: rinova la paura!
>  [the very thought of it renews the fear!]
>
> Dans: je l'ai quittee a mi-chemin.
>  [I left her half-way there.]
> Commedia: Nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita,
>  [Midway in the journey of our life,]
>
> Dans: C'est dommage.
>   [It's a pity]
> Commedia: Tant' e amara
>   [It is so bitter]
>
> The article continues, "Eliot intends no travesty of Dante here. Dante's
> words don't mock this poor Sweeneyesque waiter, but tell us who he is -- one
> of the damned and dead -- with the dignity, if not the eloquence, of real
> damnation, however unconscious. Seedy, shabby, tiresome, but his pain is
> real."
>
>    OK, List -- Is this a credible thesis?

I'm missing a logical step.  Supposing for the time being that the correlation
exists as observed between the waiter's and Dante's speech: how does the waiter
get to be "one of the damned and dead" when Dante isn't?

Marcia