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In a message dated 3/18/01 3:13:30 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
[log in to unmask] writes:


> The article claims that the waiters' speech is an allusion to the opening 
> lines of the Commedia. Since I don't know French or Italian, I'm having 
> trouble determining if the language nuances support this claim, which is 
> where I'm hoping the list will come in.
> 
> 

   

Steve, 

If you have the Princeton edition of Singleton, there are two volumes on each 
Cantica (6 volumes altogether). For each Cantica, one volume is prose 
translation and the other is commentary. As Singleton was a philologist, the 
commentary volume is mostly about nuances of word meaning, which seems to be 
what you're looking for, and might be your optimal guide.  Don't forget Dante 
is writing in medieval Italian, which might be no closer to modern Italian 
than, say, Shakespeare's English is to modern English. It's too bad Umberto 
Rossi doesn't seem to be on the list anymore, as he'd studied Dante and was a 
native speaker of Italian.

As you seem to be recommending the article, who wrote it and where is it?

pat

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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>In a message dated 3/18/01 3:13:30 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
<BR>[log in to unmask] writes:
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></B>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">The article claims that the waiters' speech is an allusion to the opening 
<BR>lines of the Commedia. Since I don't know French or Italian, I'm having 
<BR>trouble determining if the language nuances support this claim, which is 
<BR>where I'm hoping the list will come in.
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"> &nbsp;&nbsp;</FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>Steve, 
<BR>
<BR>If you have the Princeton edition of Singleton, there are two volumes on each 
<BR>Cantica (6 volumes altogether). For each Cantica, one volume is prose 
<BR>translation and the other is commentary. As Singleton was a philologist, the 
<BR>commentary volume is mostly about nuances of word meaning, which seems to be 
<BR>what you're looking for, and might be your optimal guide. &nbsp;Don't forget Dante 
<BR>is writing in medieval Italian, which might be no closer to modern Italian 
<BR>than, say, Shakespeare's English is to modern English. It's too bad Umberto 
<BR>Rossi doesn't seem to be on the list anymore, as he'd studied Dante and was a 
<BR>native speaker of Italian.
<BR>
<BR>As you seem to be recommending the article, who wrote it and where is it?
<BR>
<BR>pat</B></FONT></HTML>

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