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At the beginning of the "La Figlia" thread, for example, you
speculate about the (sub)conscious flows operating in Eliot's early poems, 
> On the five Eliot poems I'm writing about, I'm 
> fairly sure that just about every image leads back to the Commedia. 

Christopher--

It wasn't the easiest thing to tell, but maybe you intended the above as one 
of the questions you wanted me to answer.  

If so, this is the answer. I'll leave Eliot's subconscious motivations to 
those who know much more about them than I do. When I suggest that many or 
most of his images come from the Commedia, I mean he did it consciously, not 
unconsciously...if this is what he did. Didn't it ever strike you as odd that 
so many personages mentioned or evoked in TWL also appear in the Commedia? 
Ulysses, Tiresias, the Sibyl, Philomela, Cleopatra, Dido, Tristan, and so 
forth. I think when push comes to shove, you'll be the one arguing that these 
correspondences "must have been unconscious," whereas I'm inclined to think 
they were probably created in a quite conscious manner...as a studied and 
deliberate part of his working method. 

Please don't assume I'm trying to convince you of anything.  I just want to 
clarify what I'm saying, to get you up to speed on exactly what it is that 
you disagree with.

pat

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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>At the beginning of the "La Figlia" thread, for example, you
<BR>speculate about the (sub)conscious flows operating in Eliot's early poems, 
<BR>&gt; On the five Eliot poems I'm writing about, I'm 
<BR>&gt; fairly sure that just about every image leads back to the Commedia. 
<BR>
<BR>Christopher--
<BR>
<BR>It wasn't the easiest thing to tell, but maybe you intended the above as one 
<BR>of the questions you wanted me to answer. &nbsp;
<BR>
<BR>If so, this is the answer. I'll leave Eliot's subconscious motivations to 
<BR>those who know much more about them than I do. When I suggest that many or 
<BR>most of his images come from the Commedia, I mean he did it consciously, not 
<BR>unconsciously...if this is what he did. Didn't it ever strike you as odd that 
<BR>so many personages mentioned or evoked in TWL also appear in the Commedia? 
<BR>Ulysses, Tiresias, the Sibyl, Philomela, Cleopatra, Dido, Tristan, and so 
<BR>forth. I think when push comes to shove, you'll be the one arguing that these 
<BR>correspondences "must have been unconscious," whereas I'm inclined to think 
<BR>they were probably created in a quite conscious manner...as a studied and 
<BR>deliberate part of his working method. 
<BR>
<BR>Please don't assume I'm trying to convince you of anything. &nbsp;I just want to 
<BR>clarify what I'm saying, to get you up to speed on exactly what it is that 
<BR>you disagree with.
<BR>
<BR>pat</B></FONT></HTML>

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