Print

Print


--part1_dc.385bc9c.27dea739_boundary
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 3/12/01 1:43:12 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
[log in to unmask] writes:


> However, it does appear either that Pat will have to learn the math 
> involved or that the professors (or their spokespersons) will have to 
> learn to express the logic of that math in simple language (back to 
> them 26 letters and what they can do, etc), as in the complex ideas of 
> Plato expressed in the simple language of Socrates. The alternative 
> is....well, more postal slam dancing comes to mind..
> 
Ken, 

You know, square numbers and triangular numbers were discovered when the 
Pythagoreans sat around playing with pebbles that they  arranged into square 
and triangular configurations. I suppose there are areas  in mathematics 
where one has to get away from that kind of primitivism, but I doubt that 4CC 
is one of them. I learned something from having to explain complex ideas to 
students with a limited educational background and a limited ability to deal 
with abstraction--if you can't explain something to somebody else in simple 
language, then there's room to ask how well you really understand what you're 
saying yourself. I think all of us also know what a snow job is. When a 
person makes a big to-do about how I wouldn't understand the answers to the 
questions I'm asking, or how I shouldn't be asking the questions, etc etc, I 
begin to wonder what the evasion is about, and what it is I'm not supposed to 
find out. 

Anyway, Ken, why are you assuming I wouldn't know anything about the Four 
Color Theorem? I've written three books on color, and for the last one I 
wanted to say something a little more intelligent about 4CC than just 
repeating all that blah blah about "nobody understands how to solve it." I 
thought I'd at least like to find out what was supposed to make it so 
unsolvable. So I read Saaty's book, took a lot of notes, and ended up with 
more material than there really was room for in my book. Also, I wanted to 
find our more about the computer program, and Steve is the first person I've 
come across who's actually familiar with it. I should maybe be starting by 
asking him the simpler questions--like what computer language is it written 
in, how can I see a copy, and who actually wrote it.

pat

--part1_dc.385bc9c.27dea739_boundary
Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>In a message dated 3/12/01 1:43:12 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
<BR>[log in to unmask] writes:
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></B>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">However, it does appear either that Pat will have to learn the math 
<BR>involved or that the professors (or their spokespersons) will have to 
<BR>learn to express the logic of that math in simple language (back to 
<BR>them 26 letters and what they can do, etc), as in the complex ideas of 
<BR>Plato expressed in the simple language of Socrates. The alternative 
<BR>is....well, more postal slam dancing comes to mind..
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>Ken, 
<BR>
<BR>You know, square numbers and triangular numbers were discovered when the 
<BR>Pythagoreans sat around playing with pebbles that they &nbsp;arranged into square 
<BR>and triangular configurations. I suppose there are areas &nbsp;in mathematics 
<BR>where one has to get away from that kind of primitivism, but I doubt that 4CC 
<BR>is one of them. I learned something from having to explain complex ideas to 
<BR>students with a limited educational background and a limited ability to deal 
<BR>with abstraction--if you can't explain something to somebody else in simple 
<BR>language, then there's room to ask how well you really understand what you're 
<BR>saying yourself. I think all of us also know what a snow job is. When a 
<BR>person makes a big to-do about how I wouldn't understand the answers to the 
<BR>questions I'm asking, or how I shouldn't be asking the questions, etc etc, I 
<BR>begin to wonder what the evasion is about, and what it is I'm not supposed to 
<BR>find out. 
<BR>
<BR>Anyway, Ken, why are you assuming I wouldn't know anything about the Four 
<BR>Color Theorem? I've written three books on color, and for the last one I 
<BR>wanted to say something a little more intelligent about 4CC than just 
<BR>repeating all that blah blah about "nobody understands how to solve it." I 
<BR>thought I'd at least like to find out what was supposed to make it so 
<BR>unsolvable. So I read Saaty's book, took a lot of notes, and ended up with 
<BR>more material than there really was room for in my book. Also, I wanted to 
<BR>find our more about the computer program, and Steve is the first person I've 
<BR>come across who's actually familiar with it. I should maybe be starting by 
<BR>asking him the simpler questions--like what computer language is it written 
<BR>in, how can I see a copy, and who actually wrote it.
<BR>
<BR>pat</B></FONT></HTML>

--part1_dc.385bc9c.27dea739_boundary--