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In a message dated 3/12/01 9:36:41 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
[log in to unmask] writes:


> Not a mathematical problem? You have absolutely no idea what you are talking 
> about. 
> 

That seems a little strong.  I've taken and taught  Bauhaus-oriented design 
classes, and this is very much the kind of problem assigned to students,  
along with such esoterica as how to fold a piece of paper so that it will 
support a weight of 50 pounds. Also, aren't you forgetting the history of the 
Four Color Theorem? It was widely known among map-makers that for a map on a 
plane surface--or, as mathematicians would add, on the surface of a 
sphere--it never required more than four colors. It became a mathematical 
problem for an arbitrary or stipulative reason--because some mathematician 
wondered why this was so, and redefined it as a "mathematical" problem. 
Voila! From a mathematical perspective, one now pretends that the map makers 
never existed, that they were too stupid to ever check out whether it really 
worked themselves, that they somehow managed to pass on the skill for many 
generations without ever understanding how to pass on the skill, and all 
kinds of other silly things.  

pat






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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>In a message dated 3/12/01 9:36:41 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
<BR>[log in to unmask] writes:
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></B>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Not a mathematical problem? You have absolutely no idea what you are talking 
<BR>about. 
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>That seems a little strong. &nbsp;I've taken and taught &nbsp;Bauhaus-oriented design 
<BR>classes, and this is very much the kind of problem assigned to students, &nbsp;
<BR>along with such esoterica as how to fold a piece of paper so that it will 
<BR>support a weight of 50 pounds. Also, aren't you forgetting the history of the 
<BR>Four Color Theorem? It was widely known among map-makers that for a map on a 
<BR>plane surface--or, as mathematicians would add, on the surface of a 
<BR>sphere--it never required more than four colors. It became a mathematical 
<BR>problem for an arbitrary or stipulative reason--because some mathematician 
<BR>wondered why this was so, and redefined it as a "mathematical" problem. 
<BR>Voila! From a mathematical perspective, one now pretends that the map makers 
<BR>never existed, that they were too stupid to ever check out whether it really 
<BR>worked themselves, that they somehow managed to pass on the skill for many 
<BR>generations without ever understanding how to pass on the skill, and all 
<BR>kinds of other silly things. &nbsp;
<BR>
<BR>pat
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR></B></FONT></HTML>

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