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Dear Steve,

May I add, from TWL, III, 'After the event/ He wept.He promised a "new
start."'
    Doubt that TSE is alluding to the Commedia in 'A Cooking Egg', as for
instance Blake alludes to 'Jesus wept' in Matthew at the end of 'The Song of
Urizon': 'Urizon wept.' (This being the only time Christ weeps.) An allusion
is being made when something is being intentionally called into play, that
if you missed you would be missing part of the point. Something may be a
coincidence without being an allusion.
    You may wish to compare 'A Cooking Egg' to Pound's 'Hugh Selwyn
Mauberley'.
    Not everyone is weeping in the Commedia. For instance, many are smiling
(like Dante, on occasion). Pat may know, but I can't recall Virgil ever
weeping, for instance. And in the deeper regions of hell, below the eighth
bolgia, a group of traitors cannot weep: the tears are frozen in their eyes,
and cannot be released.

Yours, Jennifer

Yours, Jennifer