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I've heard of it, but since you've given me the clue already, is there still
a point in reading it? Besides, Eliot told me that much already too
(regardless of whether he intended to or not) and that kind of message is
not very helpful. I'd rather read a book that convinces me some things are
very important - like Captain Corelli's Mandolin; or even the Mel
Gibson/Helen Hunt movie "What Women Want" which I couldn't help but love.

I say that although in the context of the universe just about everything is
pretty insignificant, in the context of our own insignificance everything we
do is extremely important.

Arwin

> Its stoic wisdom will tell you that in the long run nothing is very
> important.
>
>
> Gunnar
>
> *Time is a stream, a wild river tearing away everything. Every object,
> hardly appeared, is being torn away, and another one is being brought on,
> but this one, as well, will disappear soon.*