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Hmmm. Interesting but difficult game ... Somehow I find it much easier to
remember the books that I did read. ;-) It would also be a book that I felt
I'd have to have read, but never got round to - but there was a period in my
life during which I got round to reading everything important. Besides that
I had to work through a great deal of anthology stuff, read through
Shakespeare's complete works and had most of the Latin stuff during my five
years of Latin in secondary/highschool, and read most of the rest during my
English lit; and then there were the survey courses on all major literary
periods in the history of English language, so it'd have to be something in
a different language than English I guess. Faust? I'm not sure I'd even want
to read it though. Anyone have any ideas? I could use something to read ...
last book I read was almost over a year ago I think. The book most on my
mind is the book I've been writing myself and think about practically every
other day; but I haven't managed writing a page for two years or so ...

And who's keeping the score? I'd like to lose this one though I doubt it's
very likely.

Arwin "Still Thinking but what about 'War and Peace'?" van Arum


> -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
> Van: [log in to unmask]
> [mailto:[log in to unmask]]Namens Richard Seddon
> Verzonden: zondag 11 maart 2001 2:22
> Aan: [log in to unmask]
> Onderwerp: Re: OFF TOPIC - Literary parlor game
>
>
> Rick (Homer) Seddon
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Rickard Parker <[log in to unmask]>
> To: [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>
> Date: Saturday, March 10, 2001 5:07 PM
> Subject: OFF TOPIC - Literary parlor game
>
>
> >>>From http://slate.msn.com/culturebox/entries/01-03-06_101969.asp
> >
> >In his novel Changing Places, David Lodge describes a literary
> parlor game
> >called "Humiliations" in which participants confess, one by one,
> titles of
> >books they've never read. The genius of the game is that each
> player gains
> a
> >point for each fellow player who's read the book-in other words, the more
> >accomplished the reader, the lower his or her score. Lodge's winner is an
> >American professor who, in a rousing display of one-downmanship, finally
> >announces that he's never read Hamlet.
> >
> >
> >The page has some critics playing by confessing what they haven't read.
> >There is also something about how to play a game of one-upmanship while
> >"humiliating" yourself.
> >
> >Regards,
> >   Rick (Moby Dick) Parker
> >
> >
> >
> >
>
>