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Maybe Dante's image of Mary (who wept) stayed with him, and he connected it 
up with the image (originally from Psalms) of the whole universe joining in a 
symphony to praise God for their creation. If the universe can sing, then the 
universe can weep (the weeping comets and asteroids), again perhaps because 
they were created.

This looks like a good place for you to turn to Greg Foster's wonderful 
concordance, and get a list of everywhere weeping is mentioned in any 
published Eliot poem. Then it would be interesting to see what you make of it.

pat
==================================================

In a message dated 3/9/01 11:48:12 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
[log in to unmask] writes:


> Given that the "Cooking Egg" lines about weeping follow lines about Heaven 
> (e.g., "I shall not want Pipit in Heaven"), do you think TSE is alluding to 
> the Commedia here?  The repetition of "weeping" seems to be another clue, 
> in 
> that instead of a phrase like "Weeping, hopeless multitudes" or " Weeping, 
> anguished multitudes" we have "Weeping, weeping multitudes".
> 
>     This is a small point, but I'm still pondering La Figlia's title, "The 
> Weeping Daughter" and so I'm thinking about TSE's use of the word. The only 
> other instance I can find is "Comets weep and Leonids fly" from East Coker 
> [line 64], but that doesn't seem to fit the use in "A Cooking Egg" or the 
> "La 
> Figlia" title.
> 
> 



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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>Maybe Dante's image of Mary (who wept) stayed with him, and he connected it 
<BR>up with the image (originally from Psalms) of the whole universe joining in a 
<BR>symphony to praise God for their creation. If the universe can sing, then the 
<BR>universe can weep (the weeping comets and asteroids), again perhaps because 
<BR>they were created.
<BR>
<BR>This looks like a good place for you to turn to Greg Foster's wonderful 
<BR>concordance, and get a list of everywhere weeping is mentioned in any 
<BR>published Eliot poem. Then it would be interesting to see what you make of it.
<BR>
<BR>pat
<BR>==================================================
<BR>
<BR>In a message dated 3/9/01 11:48:12 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
<BR>[log in to unmask] writes:
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></B>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Given that the "Cooking Egg" lines about weeping follow lines about Heaven 
<BR>(e.g., "I shall not want Pipit in Heaven"), do you think TSE is alluding to 
<BR>the Commedia here? &nbsp;The repetition of "weeping" seems to be another clue, 
<BR>in 
<BR>that instead of a phrase like "Weeping, hopeless multitudes" or " Weeping, 
<BR>anguished multitudes" we have "Weeping, weeping multitudes".
<BR>
<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;This is a small point, but I'm still pondering La Figlia's title, "The 
<BR>Weeping Daughter" and so I'm thinking about TSE's use of the word. The only 
<BR>other instance I can find is "Comets weep and Leonids fly" from East Coker 
<BR>[line 64], but that doesn't seem to fit the use in "A Cooking Egg" or the 
<BR>"La 
<BR>Figlia" title.
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>
<BR></B></FONT></HTML>

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