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Steve,

Maybe we need to review Pound's "Uranian muse"poem again. Urania was the muse 
of astronomy, and one of her functions was to elevate human thought--to 
encourage us to, so to speak, look at the stars. She's mentioned in that 
capacity by Milton, Spenser, and many other authors, and she also turns up a 
lot in paintings. Here's one url from among many.

http://www.eliki.com/portals/fantasy/circle/urania.html

I'm not questioning that some gay men regarded themselves as a "third sex" 
and wanted to be called Uranians (after the planet rather than the muse). But 
that goes back no earlier than the mid-1800s, and there's a much longer 
tradition of Urania as the muse of astronomy. 

Maybe Pound at least was playing with double meanings, and he did mention the 
muse, not the planet. If Pound thought TWL was a masterpiece, it makes sense 
for him to say it must have been inspired by the Uranian muse, the muse that 
elevates our thoughts and inspires us to look at the stars. A little nod to 
Dante, maybe, because each Cantica of the Commedia ends with the word 
"stelle" (stars). 

Or maybe more than a little nod. At Eliot's funeral, Pound said, "His was the 
true Dantescan voice." If Pound thought of Eliot as Dantescan, it makes sense 
to invoke the Uranian muse, who in a sense might be regarded as Dante's muse. 
In Purg. 29.41-42, Dante asks Urania to help him write his poem.

"Urania should help me with her choir
To put in verse things difficult to ponder." 

As for all that childbirth stuff, men have always compared creativity to 
giving birth, and this might be more male-bonding  jocularity abolut the male 
"mother" (Eliot) who "gave birth" to the poem. 

I don't have Pound's ditty in front of me as I write this, and I'm not saying 
I'm sure of any answer. But let's at least reopen the case at some point.

pat

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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>Steve,
<BR>
<BR>Maybe we need to review Pound's "Uranian muse"poem again. Urania was the muse 
<BR>of astronomy, and one of her functions was to elevate human thought--to 
<BR>encourage us to, so to speak, look at the stars. She's mentioned in that 
<BR>capacity by Milton, Spenser, and many other authors, and she also turns up a 
<BR>lot in paintings. Here's one url from among many.
<BR>
<BR>http://www.eliki.com/portals/fantasy/circle/urania.html
<BR>
<BR>I'm not questioning that some gay men regarded themselves as a "third sex" 
<BR>and wanted to be called Uranians (after the planet rather than the muse). But 
<BR>that goes back no earlier than the mid-1800s, and there's a much longer 
<BR>tradition of Urania as the muse of astronomy. 
<BR>
<BR>Maybe Pound at least was playing with double meanings, and he did mention the 
<BR>muse, not the planet. If Pound thought TWL was a masterpiece, it makes sense 
<BR>for him to say it must have been inspired by the Uranian muse, the muse that 
<BR>elevates our thoughts and inspires us to look at the stars. A little nod to 
<BR>Dante, maybe, because each Cantica of the Commedia ends with the word 
<BR>"stelle" (stars). 
<BR>
<BR>Or maybe more than a little nod. At Eliot's funeral, Pound said, "His was the 
<BR>true Dantescan voice." If Pound thought of Eliot as Dantescan, it makes sense 
<BR>to invoke the Uranian muse, who in a sense might be regarded as Dante's muse. 
<BR>In Purg. 29.41-42, Dante asks Urania to help him write his poem.
<BR>
<BR>"Urania should help me with her choir
<BR>To put in verse things difficult to ponder." 
<BR>
<BR>As for all that childbirth stuff, men have always compared creativity to 
<BR>giving birth, and this might be more male-bonding &nbsp;jocularity abolut the male 
<BR>"mother" (Eliot) who "gave birth" to the poem. 
<BR>
<BR>I don't have Pound's ditty in front of me as I write this, and I'm not saying 
<BR>I'm sure of any answer. But let's at least reopen the case at some point.
<BR>
<BR>pat</B></FONT></HTML>

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