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You don't say what dictionary you used. I have Cassell's. As a synonym for 
English "conceive" it has Italian "pensare."

pat
==========================================
In a message dated 3/1/01 10:56:18 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
[log in to unmask] writes:


> Subj:Re: the Uranian muse again
> Date:3/1/01 10:56:18 AM Eastern Standard Time
> From:    [log in to unmask] (Rickard A Parker)
> Sender:    [log in to unmask]
> Reply-to: <A HREF="mailto:[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]</A>
> To:    [log in to unmask]
> 
> 
> 
> 
> > If we know the edition used by Eliot, what could possibly be the
> > justification for using a different edition? I can understand your
> > passion for wanting to do everything on the internet, because I too
> > like the lazy fantasy of never getting out of one's chair.
> 
> You would have a hard time convincing me that Eliot, who knew Latin
> and French, would take the English translation at face value.
> Especially since the Temple Classics edition provides, I believe,
> facing Italian and English renditions (very useful for the lazy.)
> 
> So I provided the Italian and, knowing that there aren't many on the
> list who know Italian, I provided some other translations also to,
> maybe, convince those who don't know it that "cose a pensar mettere in
> versi" does not have much to do with making babies (not a very lazy
> thing for me to do, I might add.)  I don't know Italian either I must
> say, but from some old French and Spanish I just can't see "pensar"
> used in Italian for baby-making.  I allowed for Italian speakers to
> put me to shame: 
> 
> > I doubt that the Italian "pensar" is used or was used in any kind of
> > way for physical conception.
> 
> I think that Eliot checked the Italian and would not have seen any pun
> in it.  If you want to argue that his puns depended on one having a
> specific translation of Dante, that is a different matter.
> 
> Regards,
>    Rick Parker
> 
> PS - if you are interested in word-play note the two different forms
> of "versi":
>     Or convien che Elicona per me versi,
>       e Uranie m'aiuti col suo coro
>       forti cose a pensar mettere in versi.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 



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<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><FONT  SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>You don't say what dictionary you used. I have Cassell's. As a synonym for 
<BR>English "conceive" it has Italian "pensare."
<BR>
<BR>pat
<BR>==========================================
<BR>In a message dated 3/1/01 10:56:18 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
<BR>[log in to unmask] writes:
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0"></B>
<BR><BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE style="BORDER-LEFT: #0000ff 2px solid; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px">Subj:<B>Re: the Uranian muse again</B>
<BR>Date:3/1/01 10:56:18 AM Eastern Standard Time
<BR>From: &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;[log in to unmask] (Rickard A Parker)
<BR>Sender: &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;[log in to unmask]
<BR>Reply-to: <A HREF="mailto:[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]</A>
<BR>To: &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;[log in to unmask]
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>
<BR>&gt; If we know the edition used by Eliot, what could possibly be the
<BR>&gt; justification for using a different edition? I can understand your
<BR>&gt; passion for wanting to do everything on the internet, because I too
<BR>&gt; like the lazy fantasy of never getting out of one's chair.
<BR>
<BR>You would have a hard time convincing me that Eliot, who knew Latin
<BR>and French, would take the English translation at face value.
<BR>Especially since the Temple Classics edition provides, I believe,
<BR>facing Italian and English renditions (very useful for the lazy.)
<BR>
<BR>So I provided the Italian and, knowing that there aren't many on the
<BR>list who know Italian, I provided some other translations also to,
<BR>maybe, convince those who don't know it that "cose a pensar mettere in
<BR>versi" does not have much to do with making babies (not a very lazy
<BR>thing for me to do, I might add.) &nbsp;I don't know Italian either I must
<BR>say, but from some old French and Spanish I just can't see "pensar"
<BR>used in Italian for baby-making. &nbsp;I allowed for Italian speakers to
<BR>put me to shame: 
<BR>
<BR>&gt; I doubt that the Italian "pensar" is used or was used in any kind of
<BR>&gt; way for physical conception.
<BR>
<BR>I think that Eliot checked the Italian and would not have seen any pun
<BR>in it. &nbsp;If you want to argue that his puns depended on one having a
<BR>specific translation of Dante, that is a different matter.
<BR>
<BR>Regards,
<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;Rick Parker
<BR>
<BR>PS - if you are interested in word-play note the two different forms
<BR>of "versi":
<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Or convien che Elicona per me versi,
<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;e Uranie m'aiuti col suo coro
<BR> &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;forti cose a pensar mettere in versi.
<BR>
<BR></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#0f0f0f" SIZE=2 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">
<BR>
<BR>
<BR></BLOCKQUOTE>
<BR></FONT></FONT><FONT  COLOR="#000000" SIZE=3 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial Narrow" LANG="0"><B>
<BR></B></FONT></HTML>

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