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I don't think the phrase 'dans le restaurant' sounds really clumsy in
French. Of course, most people eating out would say 'on va au restaurant'
and 'on est au restaurant', but 'dans' doesn't sound odd. It emphasises the
fact that the scene takes place inside a particular building - as you point
out, one can be 'au restaurant' and still be outside the building, e.g. on
the terrace. The first time one reads the poem, the title phrase appears
outside any context: I don't remember finding it non-idiomatic (unlike
several things in the poem itself).

Yours,

RaphaŽl Ingelbien
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----- Original Message -----
From: Gunnar Jauch <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, March 20, 2001 11:29 AM
Subject: Re: 4Q, BN and the bird


>
>
> >  in the
> > ongoing debate on "Dans Le Restaurant")
>
> To all,
>
> Re-reading my previous post I have stumbled over *"DANS" le Resto*. Like
*le fait
> est dur* this sounds odd and clumsy. One simply doesn't go *dans* le
restaurant,
> but *au restaurant*. *Dans* is too literal and means *inside* the place,
in other
> words the discussion could only have happened indoors, not e.g. on the
terrace. I'm
> sure Raphael  will confirm this.
>
>
> Cheers,
>
>
> Gunnar
>
>
>